Q&A: 2016-2017 Prospective Global Champions for Change - Skills Development Group

Dear Prospective Champions,

This is the e-discussion thread for Skills Development Group. If you have a general question, please add it and discuss it in this forum. We would like to encourage support to and collaboration with other contestants. Only with working closely together, we can all win.  

May you have a fun and educative rally!

 

The Empower Women Team

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  • Hazem Essam
    Hello All as we learn from Empower women to be part of the change in the world ,whatever you become champion or not as everybody can be champion in his /her family, schoolcollege, county and world.Everybody has a champion  inside her/him so we must start from us by learning  to make something benefit another  so  this some steps to make Event : 

    1.      Develop Event Goal and Objectives

    The very first step is to establish a tangible goal and  objectives. (e.g., why are you organizing this event and what do you hope to achieve?)

    2.      Organize a Team

    Any event takes a concerted team effort to handle all of the details. Consider identifying one key Event Manager or Event Chair as well as individual Chairpersons for subcommittees, such as:

    • venue management;
    • speakers;
    • entertainment;
    • publicity;
    • sponsors;
    • volunteer management

    3.      Set a Date

    The date might already be pre-set for a reoccurring event, but if this is a new event, be sure to consider the following before firming up your date:

    • Give yourself enough time! Ideally, you should have 4-6 months to plan (depending on the nature of your event)
    • Be aware of statutory and religious holidays
    • Avoid school holiday time periods (e.g., winter, spring and summer holidays)
    • Check dates with key participants – e.g., speakers, presenters, VIP guests, etc.


    4.     
     Brand Your Event

    If you want your event to stand out, you need to choose a timely and compelling theme that sets you apart from your competition. This means that you need to come up with a dynamic overall theme and you need to take great care with the actual name – since it can be a key attention-getter, especially in online media.

    • Brainstorm names: When you are brainstorming the event name, think about:
      • how is your event different from other events in your sector?
      • what are you hoping to convey through this event?
    • Create a Tagline: Once you’ve come up with a name, also try to craft a tagline – a short, memorable branding slogan that describes the event. 
    • Design a Logo: The final step will be having a logo created to represent your event. A logo can be an effective branding tool – offering immediate recognition of your event in all of your publicity and promo items (e.g., Tshirts, water bottles, bags, etc.) 

    5.      Create a Master Plan:

    This plan should encompass all aspects of the event, including:

    • Venue, logistics & catering management (contracts, permits, insurance, etc.)
    • Speakers/presenters (identifying, confirming, logistics & management)
    • Activities/entertainment
    • Publicity/promotion (online & off-line, e.g.,: web page & online promotion; events calendars; printed programs; media relations; signage; social media, etc.)
    • Registration (online sign-up, payment and tracking; on-site sign-in, etc.)
    • Sponsor/partner management
    • Volunteer management

    6.      Determine Administrative Processes

    In other words, how are you going to keep track of your planning, registration, budget, guest and speakers lists, etc.? 

    7.      Identify and Establish Partnerships & Sponsors

    Are there organizations that you could partner with or call on for sponsorships to defray the costs and increase potential participation?  When you involve other people or groups in your event, they have a stake in helping spread the word and making the event a success.

    You might want to consider:

    • Seeking corporate sponsors to fund a portion of the event. This can range from national organizations that might want to sponsor a dinner, offer a door prize or a key silent auction item, to local businesses that might be able to provide goods or services, such as flowers for the tables, gift bag items, etc.
    • Partnering with community organizations who might be able to offer a venue and/or assistance with organizing or staffing an event

     

    8.      Create a Publicity Plan

    Even with the most amazing speaker or entertainment line-up, you need publicity to get people in the door.  Event promotion starts with the initial notice or page on your website, note in your newsletter or email to save the date, and then builds to include online and off-line publicity, media relations and on-going outreach to encourage registration. And no plan is complete without the post-event thank-you’s, sponsor acknowledgements and articles about the event’s key messages or fundraising success.

    9.      Establish a Budget

    Your budget should incorporate estimates for all of the key items identified on your Event Master Plan. Don’t forget to include any travel or accommodation costs for speakers, presenters, etc.

    10.    Determine Evaluation Process

    How will you determine if your event is a success? Do you measure success by the number of registrants or attendees or is it dependent on you breaking even or raising a target amount in donations? 

    When you set your initial event goals and objectives, you should also consider how you will evaluate the event to determine your success.  If you are using a membership management software package, such as Wild Apricot’s, you can easily track registration numbers and fees. But, if your event involves tracking, for example, a silent auction, then you’ll need to put some processes in place to identify goods offered in kind and funds raised at the event. 

    By the same token, if the objective of your event is to raise awareness, you’ll have to benchmark and gather data on online social media activity/mentions etc. and offline publicity – again based on your initial goals.

    • Uzoma Katchy
      Thank you Hazeem. This resource is very useful. 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Mildred Kisiangani
    Hello men and women of virtues...one thing! The struggle continues #AlutaContinua...until all women are economically empowered. Until attaining 1/3 gender rule is automatic.
  • Mike Okonkwo
    Congratulations to all champions!!!
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      Thank you Kelvin. Are you also a Champion?
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Lilian Ifemeludike
    Hello everyone,

    It's the end of the year again and as the year draws to a close, for me, it's always a time of deep and sober reflection of the past months, my aspirations, goals (met and unmet), dreams, and even more importantly, how I have touched lives in my little way, inspired or encouraged someone, re think some of my past decisions, mistakes or regrets. This is because everyday for me is a precious and invaluable gift and to someone that needs me, my skill or my intellect to help improve them.
    Seeing my name on the list is absolutely humbling and with it, came a huge flush of responsibility and reality. There is work to be done and I'm rolling up my sleeves to get this work done. I know we are all champions, championing our various causes from different ends of the globe and Bravo! to us all who are putting foot forward everyday for the collective good of women, children and the whole of humanity because in the end of it all, this is why we breathe and live. 
    To all who made the list, congratulations to you all. I look forward to working with you all on different levels and capacities. Let's do this. I love you all. 
  • Florence Iminza
    Great! We are an expanded team, congratulations to the new team and lets keep working!
  • Diana Rusu

    Dear All,

    As promised during the webinars, on 10 December Empower Women has announced the 2016-2017 Champions for Change! To look at the full list, please visit: https://www.empowerwomen.org/en/who-we-are/news/2016/12/empower-women-announces-the-2016-2017-champions-for-change.

    We would like to thank you all for your hard work and dedication. Please try not to be discouraged if you did not make it. Consider this as a warm up so you can do a lot better next year when we announce the new call for applications. 

    Please find below are the 2016-2017 Champions for Change appearing in alphabetic order:

    Adina Laura

    United States

    Aisha Keita

    Gambia

    Ajibola Mujidat Oladejo

    Nigeria

    Akila Kadgathur

    India

    Alaeddine Oueslati

    Tunisia

    Amanda Chehrezad

    United States

    Aminka Belvitt

    Canada

    Angela Bakibinga

    Uganda

    Anuoluwapo Adelakum

    Nigeria

    Bongwong Justin

    Cameroon 

    Carol Ajie

    Nigeria

    Cassandra Nadira Lee

    Singapore

    Chiara Gonzi

    Italy

    Clarindi Greef

    South Africa

    Danayi Musamirapanwe

    Zimbabwe

    Djemi Michele

    Cameroon 

    Dorcas Addai

    Ghana

    Dorcas Tshuma

    South Africa

    Doreen Anene

    Nigeria

    Ekaterina Porras Sivoloba

    Mexico

    Elvira Atehwah

    Cameroon 

    Emilia Ortiz Mulé

    Ecuador

    Evelyn Ifeyinwa Ezeagu

    Nigeria

    Ezinne Ikejianni

    Nigeria

    Faith Ayegba

    Nigeria

    Farai Masuwa

    Zimbabwe

    Fifi Oduro-Nyarkoh

    Ghana

    Gayoung Sally Kim

    Korea

    Immaculata Anudu

    Nigeria

    Isabella Muthoni Muriera

    Kenya

    Jacqueline Salguero Huaman

    Peru

    Jessica Foumena

    Cameroon 

    Joel Odota

    Uganda

    Josephine Adeti

    Kenya

    Kateryna Hrom

    Ukraine

    Keithlin Caroo

    Saint Lucia

    Lemona Chanda

    Canada

    Lenka Vybíralová

    Czech Republic

    Lucia Dalenz

    Uruguay

    Mahwash Rehman

    Pakistan

    Majesté Nkundimfura

    Rwanda

    Mildred Kisiangani

    Kenya

    Moreangels Mbizah

    Zimbabwe

    Moureen Njule Esseme

    Cameroon 

    Nasra Hassan

    Somalia

    Natalie Magee

    Germany

    Ozlem Alparslan

    Turkey

    Peony Chan

    Canada

    Robert Legget

    United States

    Rupande Mehta

    India

    Sarah Hesterman

    United States

    Snezana Zivcevska-Stalpers

    Netherlands

    Theresa Muzondo

    Zimbabwe

    Tumelo Mogotsi

    Botswana

    Valentine Kamau

    Kenya

    Vanessa Avila

    United States

    Veronica Ngum Ndi

    Cameroon 

    Veronica Portugal

    Mexico

    Wanyana Racheal

    Uganda

    Wilhemina Gaoses

    Namibia

    Zanele Xaba

    South Africa


    Thank you everyone for your great work!

    Keep empowering,

    Diana

     

     
    • Manisha Kad
      Did you publish full list here or this is latest list? I can not see my name here. However I received the email in which my name is present in list of 170 and I also received invitation of webinar. Please clarify.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Mwabi Moyo
    CONGATULATIONS TO ALL CHAMPIONS!

    Let us not take this for granted. May we all do our best to contribute to possitive change through the UN Empower Women Program. With commitment and dertemination all things are possible. 
  • Hazem Essam
    Congratulation for all champions whatever you are chosen or not   all of us  are champions  . champions in our country champions in our city champions in our  society we live . but the real champion who will add value to people  empower him because everyone deserve  to learn  to be able to make a difference as  we learn finally I thank you  because i really learn great things from you 
  • Kholoud Abo Elkheir
    Hello ladies,

    The rally is over now and it was great to work and be inspired by all your contributions. I don't know if the selection process had been ended, I didn't recieve and response yet, but I think we are all should keep work and write women empowerment stories. I would like to continue read and be inspired by all of you.

    Have a good day.
  • Mariam Negm
    Hey Prospective Champions! As the rally is coming to an end, I would like to thank each and every one of you. This has been extremely informative and definitely inspiring!  I'm more motivated than ever to empower women in my community, it has always been a passion of mine. All kinds of actions make a difference, from launching large-scale awareness campaigns to giving a young girl advice on how to manage her money to encouraging your friend to speak in front of an audience, THEY ALL MATTER. 

    I decided to do one small act a day that could empower women, even if it's just by sharing a Facebook post, giving a pep talk or reading more on an economic subject.

    Let's all use our voices, support each other and become CHANGE AGENTS in our community! :)
  • Doris Mollel
    My year has been wonderfull, did more than 12 activities  that touchde peoples lives especially the born too soon. am happy i mentored 2 girls and they have alredy started their foundations and doing very well now, it was a year of giving !
    • Irene Lyimo
      Doris,

      A warm congrats to you,

      I am proud of you and all Tanzania's how have been given a chance  to voice our offline and online activity for the first time ever.

      Proud of you all.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    The rally is over but empower women we must. How has your year been so far? As it comes to an end how are you celebrating success? As my mentoring draws to a close this year I would like to celebrate my student all the way in India for her dedication and progress in her business as a female entrepreneur. Who will you be celebrating?
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Congratulations to you Ogbeyalu and Uzoma. There was a lot I learnt from your interactuons on this platform.  I look forward to working with you and having productive exchanges as we push women's well-being and welfare at the front burner. Cheers! 
    • Uzoma Katchy
      I celebrate the teenagers l mentored. They are developing Leadership and Life Skills.
      I celebrate  the women l counselled . They are making  better and informed decisions and  working on their  financial  goals.
      I celebrate my children who are learning from  my  wealth of experience. 
      I celebrate The Prospective Champions  for your contributions.
    • Maria Pedro Miala
      I will also celebrate the student I am mentoring right now, through our effort she has  just been offered a great opportunity.
    • Mike Okonkwo
      I think I will celebrate myself.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Kudos to all the grandma and mothers who taught their kids at a young age how to manage their finances. It creates a clearer path for enterpreneurs on how to manage their businesses.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      I am a mother. Thanks for appreciating us. We teach other  things that matter most about  life. Financial Literacy  is just a part.Without the rest, there won't be a perfect  fit.
      Thanks anyway.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Teaching young girls financial and digital literacy is important. This will give them a head start and direction in what  professional path they want to take. It will also encourage them to go for male orientation subjects and jobs. This way , it will help close the gender gap.
  • Hazem Essam

    Introduction to Balance Sheet

    The accounting balance sheet is one of the major financial statements used by accountants and business owners. (The other major financial statements are the income statementstatement of cash flows, and statement of stockholders' equity) The balance sheet is also referred to as the statement of financial position.

    The balance sheet presents a company's financial position at the end of a specified date. Some describe the balance sheet as a "snapshot" of the company's financial position at a point (a moment or an instant) in time. For example, the amounts reported on a balance sheet dated December 31, 2015 reflect that instant when all the transactions through December 31 have been recorded.

    Because the balance sheet informs the reader of a company's financial position as of one moment in time, it allows someone—like a creditor—to see what a company owns as well as what it owes to other parties as of the date indicated in the heading. This is valuable information to the banker who wants to determine whether or not a company qualifies for additional credit or loans. Others who would be interested in the balance sheet include current investors, potential investors, company management, suppliers, some customers, competitors, government agencies, and labor unions.

    We will begin our explanation of the accounting balance sheet with its major components, elements, or major categories:

    • Assets
    • Liabilities
    • Owner's (Stockholders') Equity

    Assets

    Assets are things that the company owns. They are the resources of the company that have been acquired through transactions, and have future economic value that can be measured and expressed in dollars. Assets also include costs paid in advance that have not yet expired, such as prepaid advertising, prepaid insurance, prepaid legal fees, and prepaid rent. 

    Examples of asset accounts that are reported on a company's balance sheet include:

     

    Classifications Of Assets On The Balance Sheet

    Accountants usually prepare classified balance sheets. "Classified" means that the balance sheet accounts are presented in distinct groupings, categories, or classifications. The asset classifications and their order of appearance on the balance sheet are:

    An outline of a balance sheet using the balance sheet classifications is shown here: 05X-table-01

     

    - Liabilities

    Liabilities are obligations of the company; they are amounts owed to creditors for a past transaction and they usually have the word "payable" in their account title. Along with owner's equity, liabilities can be thought of as a source of the company's assets. They can also be thought of as a claim against a company's assets. For example, a company's balance sheet reports assets of $100,000 and Accounts Payable of $40,000 and owner's equity of $60,000. The source of the company's assets are creditors/suppliers for $40,000 and the owners for $60,000. The creditors/suppliers have a claim against the company's assets and the owner can claim what remains after the Accounts Payable have been paid.

    Liabilities also include amounts received in advance for future services. Since the amount received (recorded as the asset Cash) has not yet been earned, the company defers the reporting of revenues and instead reports a liability such as Unearned Revenues or Customer Deposits. 

    Examples of liability accounts reported on a company's balance sheet include:

     

    Classifications Of Liabilities On The Balance Sheet

    Liability and contra liability accounts are usually classified (put into distinct groupings, categories, or classifications) on the balance sheet. The liability classifications and their order of appearance on the balance sheet are:

    - Owner's (Stockholders') Equity

    Owner's Equity—along with liabilities—can be thought of as a source of the company's assets. Owner's equity is sometimes referred to as the book value of the company, because owner's equity is equal to the reported asset amounts minus the reported liability amounts.

    Owner's equity may also be referred to as the residual of assets minus liabilities. These references make sense if you think of the basic accounting equation:

    Assets = Liabilities + Owner's Equity
    and just rearrange the terms:
    Owner's Equity = Assets - Liabilities

    "Owner's Equity" are the words used on the balance sheet when the company is a sole proprietorship. If the company is a corporation, the words Stockholders' Equity are used instead of Owner's Equity. An example of an owner's equity account is Mary Smith, Capital (where Mary Smith is the owner of the sole proprietorship). Examples of stockholders' equity accounts include:

    Both owner's equity and stockholders' equity accounts will normally have credit balances.

    Contra owner's equity accounts are a category of owner equity accounts with debit balances. (A debit balance in an owner's equity account is contrary—or contra—to an owner's equity account's usual credit balance.) An example of a contra owner's equity account is Mary Smith, Drawing (where Mary Smith is the owner of the sole proprietorship). An example of a contra stockholders' equity account is Treasury Stock.

    Classifications of Owner's Equity On The Balance Sheet

    Owner's equity is generally represented on the balance sheet with two or three accounts (e.g., Mary Smith, Capital; Mary Smith, Drawing; and perhaps Current Year's Net Income)

    The stockholders' equity section of a corporation's balance sheet is:

    The stockholders' equity section of a corporation's balance sheet is: 05X-table-02

     

  • Hazem Essam
     
    To deal well with financial literacy we must know how to make  our income statement which is essential for everyone so  What the income statement ?  is sometimes referred to as the profit and loss statement(P&L), statement of operations, or statement of income. ... Keep in mind that the income statement shows revenues, expenses, gains, and losses; it does not show cash receipts (money you receive) nor cash disbursements (money you pay out).

    The income statement is one of the major financial statements used by accountants and business owners. (The other major financial statements are the balance sheetstatement of cash flows, and the statement of stockholders' equity.) The income statement is sometimes referred to as the profit and loss statement (P&L), statement of operations, or statement of income. We will use income statement and profit and loss statement throughout this explanation.

    The income statement is important because it shows the profitability of a company or person during the time interval specified in its heading. The period of time that the statement covers is chosen by the business and will vary.

    04X-inline-01

    Simple income statement can everyone make it  

    04X-table-01

  • Cynthia Etonge
    Thanks very much for the opportunity to share our stories and to be able to learn from others. it has been a life changing experience
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Tired of wasting precious development time? Learn to get code done faster with the quick tips in our FREE eBook. Download it now! http://spr.ly/60408JD5M. I think this might be useful. Cheers
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Doris Mollel
    Hi every one,
    hope all is well i got time to share my story  of how a women and total community are  happy using mobile financial services in Tanzania, from sending and receiving money, paying bills, doing transactions  from bank to phone, taking loans through a product named M-pawa from Vodacom Tanzania.
    i wish the world could come to possibilities  of sending and receiving money via mobile phone just in that exacly time.

    at the end of the day a world where humanitarian is key!
    see my story https://youtu.be/sasEibdNxPU
    • Mwabi Moyo
      Thanks for sharing. Indeed mobile financial services have made life easy for many women. Instead of spending time travelling long distances to access financial services, which has been a limitations for most of them, they are now able to carry out transitions from  where ever they are.
    • Maria Pedro Miala
      Thanks for sharing. I only knew M-pesa, not M-pawa.
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      thanks for sharing. Will check it out.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Hazem Essam
    To apply financial literacy  in our country we need to gain leadership skills so
    What leadership skill mean :
    Leadership skills are the strengths and abilities individuals demonstrate that help the oversee processes, guide initiatives and steer their employees toward the achievement of goals.

    leadership skills are an essential component in positioning executives to make thoughtful decisions about their organization's mission and goals, and properly allocate resources to achieve those directives. Valuable leadership skills include the ability to delegate, inspire and communicate effectively. Other leadership traits include honesty, confidence, commitment and creativity.

    In information technology (IT), executives are often required to be a jack-of-all-trades. In addition to being able to plan strategically, their leadership skills must also be directed towards risk managementdisaster recoverycompliance and other aspects of data governance

    • Doris Mollel
      i agree with  you Uzoma, adding up proper strategy on how to impact the knowledge from family  level to National level.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Developing Leadership Skills will go a long way to hep individuals  become more effective in their pursuits. Problem solving, decision making  are essential skills that need to be developed in people.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Mira Morkos
    Hello prospective champions, I was busy the last few days shooting my story when I got surprised with an email thanking us for our contribution. Does this mean if I will upload my story tonight, it will not be considered as a contribution for the rally? . Does anyone here have an idea and can help? 
    Thanks in advance.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Yvonne Akoth
    Dear Prospective Champions

    I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for sharing your views. It has a been a great learning experience for me. I look forward to connecting with all of you because I am sure together, we will make the world a better place for women and girls by ensuring their economic empowerment.

    Twitter:@yvonnebellys
    Skype: yvonne.akoth
    Email: yvoneakoth@yahoo.com
    • Cynthia Etonge
      well noted Yvonne. Of course it has been a very interesting journey and i have learnt a lot.

      Twitter:@cynthiaapril1
      skype:cynthia.etonge
      Email:cynthylee2000@yahoo.com
    • Doris Mollel
      thank you yvonne
      mine is dorismolleldmf@gmail.com
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Joel Odota
    Hello all,
    Just have a bit of your time to watch the story of this great lady in my village. In an interview with her, i felt very thrilled with how she is progress catecy of digital and financial literacy. Her story is surely worth sharing. Regards everyone and i wish you good luck in everything.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qz6AjR4QiA
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Thanks so much for sharing.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Joel,

      Thank you for sharing this very inspiring story. I will definatey share it in my youth and women's network.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Hazem Essam

    What Is Financial Literacy?

    Financial literacy is the confluence of financial, credit and debt management and the knowledge that is necessary to make financially responsible decisions—decisions that are integral to our everyday lives. Financial literacy includes understanding how a checking account works, what using a credit card really means, and how to avoid debt. In sum, financial literacy impacts the daily decisions an average family makes when trying to balance a budget, buy a home, fund their children’s education and ensure an income at retirement.  A lack of financial literacy is not a problem only in emerging or developing economies. Consumers in developed or advanced economies also fail to demonstrate a strong grasp of financial principles in order to understand and negotiate the financial landscape, manage financial risks effectively and avoid financial pitfalls. Nations globally, from Korea to Australia, or from Germany to the U.S., are faced with populations who do not understand financial basics. The level of financial literacy varies according to education and income levels, but evidence shows that highly educated consumers with high incomes can be just as ignorant about financial issues as less educated, lower income consumers. Although in general, lower income individuals tend to be less financially literate. And it seems consumers are hesitant to learn. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) cited a survey conducted in Canada which found choosing the right investment for a retirement savings plan was more stressful than a visit to the dentist.

    Five Trends Forcing Financial Literacy

    Compounding the problems associated with poor financial literacy, it appears financial decision making is also getting more onerous for consumers. Five trends are converging that demonstrate the importance for making thoughtful and informed decisions about finances:
    1. Consumers are shouldering more of the financial decisions: Retirement planning is one example of this shift. Past generations depended on pension funds to provide the bulk of their retirement funding. Pension funds are managed by professionals and put the financial burden on the companies or governments that sponsored them. Consumers were not involved with the decision making, typically did not even contribute their own funds, and they were rarely made aware of the funding status or investments held by the pension. Today, pensions are more a rarity than the norm, especially for new workers. Instead, employees are being offered the ability to participate in 401K savings plans, in which they need to make investment decisions and contribute to the plans.
    2. Complex options: Consumers are also being asked to choose among various investment and savings products. These products are more sophisticated than in the past, asking consumers to choose among different products options offering varying interest rates and maturities, decisions they are not adequately educated to make. Deciding on complex financial instruments with a large range of options can impact the consumer’s ability to buy a home, finance an education or save for retirement, further complicating financial decision making.
    3. Lack of government aid: The major source of retirement income in past generations was Social Security. But the amount paid by Social Security is not enough, and it may not be available at all in the future. The Social Security Board of Trustees reported that by 2033 the Social Security trust fund may be depleted, a scary prospect for many. So now, Social Security acts more like a potential safety net that may provide enough for basic survival. 
    4. Longer life spans: We are living longer. This means we need more retirement savings than prior generations.
    5. Changing environment: The financial landscape is very dynamic. Now a global marketplace, there are many more participants in the market and many more factors that can influence it. The quickly changing environment created by technological advances such as electronic trading make the financial markets even swifter and more volatile. Taken together these factors can cause conflicting views and difficultly in creating, implementing and following a financial roadmap.
    6. Too many choices: Banks, credit unions, brokerage firms, insurance firms, credit card companies, mortgage companiesfinancial planners, and other financial service companies are all vying for assets creating confusion for the consumer.

    Why It Matters

    Financial literacy is crucial to help ensure consumers save enough to provide adequate income in retirement while avoiding high levels of debt that might result in bankruptcy and foreclosures. A study from financial services company TIAA-CREF showed that those with high financial literacy plan for retirement and in essence have double the wealth of people who do not plan for retirement. Conversely, those with low financial literacy borrow more, have less wealth and end up paying unnecessary fees for financial products. In other words, those with lower financial literacy tend to buy on credit, and are unable to pay their full balance each month and end up spending more on interest fees. This group also does not invest, has trouble with debt and a poor understanding of the terms of their mortgages or loans. Even more worrisome, many consumers believe that they are far more financially literate than they really are. And while this may seem like an individual problem, it is broader in nature and more influential on the entire population than previously believed. All one needs to do is look at the financial crisis of 2008 to see the financial impact on the entire economy from a lack of understanding of mortgage products and the subsequent defaults. Financial literacy is an issue with broad implications for economic health and an improvement can lead the way to a global economy that is competitive and strong. 

    The Bottom Line

    Any improvement in financial literacy will have a profound impact on consumers and their ability to provide for their future while avoiding the pitfalls of debt. Recent trends are making it all the more imperative that consumers understand basic finances because they are being asked to shoulder more of the burden of investment decisions in their retirement accounts while having to decipher more complex financial products and options. The tasks are not easy but a better understanding and more knowledge can ease the burden tremendously.
     
     
     
     
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Hazem,

      Thank you for sharing very detailed information about financial literacy.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    This platform through digital literacy has connected us from all over the world bringing us under one roof with one purpose: empowerment!
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Education during the pre-digital era wasn't as informative and connected as it is this day and age. Was impossible to use online methods for studying, now it is possible to study abroad while in a different country.
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      I also wish to state that the digital age has made education and learning more convenient. As a matter of fact, one can attend classes without leaving one's comfort zone. 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Does digital literacy help reduce carbon emission? I think so. Spending more time online to work rather than driving sure does. It has helped in cutting gas emission.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Ogbeyalu,

      Yes. Digital litercy can help reduce carbon emission. In my opinion, one can use technology and internet to advocate against practises that promote carbon emission as well as create awarness about the danger of carbon emissions.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Liza Durón
    I have a resource that we use on Mozilla Foundation: https://mozilla.github.io/womenandweb/
    Mozilla’s Women and Web Literacy Program is a community of allies, executives and young leaders who are actively advancing the principles of the open Internet by:
    • Supporting women in technology
    • Increasing web literacy
    • Supporting gender equality and inclusion online

    Hope you like it!
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Liza,

      This is a great program. I love it! I will share it with the young women in my community.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Thanks for sharing. 
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Liza Durón
    It has been amazing working with all of you!!! <3
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Mildred Kisiangani
    Dear Team mates, its been great interracting with you. I have surely learn alot from you great guys. In the past 3days I have been tied up in the village nurturing leaders- teen girls. Unfortunately no computer in the village but am catching up with your insights. I will surely miss 'us'. Lets keep lighting up our societies. We are all champions!

    From the discussions, I have learnt that women all over the world face almost similar challenges.

    Financial Literacy and digital empowerment are very key in Women Economic Empowerment.

    Lets continue interracting and sharing ideas even after the rally.

    Facebook Nafula Kisiangani, Twitter @milkisiangani

    God Bless!
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Adekemi Adeduntan
    Hi everyone, the rally is gradually coming to an end and I must say it has been challenging, interesting and above all educating.
      THE TWO CONCEPTS THAT WORKS HAND-IN-HAND.
    Financial literacy is understarting how money works and digital literacy is the ability to use digital tools and facilities to access digital resources. 

    Understanding  how to make financially responsible decisions, managing one's credit and debt are skills that are essential to our daily lives without which one can be vulnerable to all kinds of poor financial decisions.

    Digital literacy is an essential component of being able to communicate with the modern world and access proffesssional opportunities. These two concepts work hand-in-hand as having proper knowledge of both will make one enjoy their benefits to the fullest. 

    Together, digital and financial literacy are vital tools to access financial and social services which includes avoiding high level of debt, acess to credit, mobile or e-banking and saving for retirement which will all help to achieve economic development.
    • Juliet Odhiambo
      I have thoughts about using Digital space for financial literacy...theonly problem is it would work for those who are already digitally literate...
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Nwasinachi Menkiti
    Women in Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps can be helped to deveop a skill while they await peace to return in the towns. Sadly, the government are not doing enough for them. I have been to an IDP camp recently and most shanty structures for schooling and clinic were put in place by NGOs and Religious bodies. Are there ways to help these women? Aside gvernment, how can they be rehabilitated because its obvious government are less concerned about their welfare.

    NWASINACHI
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Non governmental organizations have also played a huge part in integrating these women into the society through skill development and makeshift schools. 
    • Uzoma Katchy
      I know that some religious organisations have done a lot in rehabilitating these women. Skills Development  and Book keeping trainings have been carried out .Most of these women that are now involved with those religious organisations have been stabilised. 
      But more work needs to be done.
      My worry is that  some of these women  and girls are sexually molested  and some have taken  to prostitution in these camps.What happens  to the children that will be born because of these activities. 
      I see another problem looming.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Women in Internally Displaced Camps especially in northern Nigeria are often times neglected and their needs not properly met. We have had situations where women had had to turn to prostitution in order to survive in these camps. Recently, we engaged a team of celebrities to rally and reach out to women in these camps so as to provide them with basic needs like food, sanitary and medical supplies in an IDP Camp in Abuja Nigeria. Some of the young women took acting and modelling classes while some others were selected for audition. It is very important that women in the localities where these camps are located begin and continue to work together, synergising their skills and abilities to train and empower women in these camps. If Lilian resides in Abuja, Nigeria and Miss Nwasinachi also lives in Abuja, Nigeria, we can team up, marshall our energy, time and resources and work to help women in the IDP camps in Abuja and environs. We can also solicit help from non-profits our us, philanthropists and wives of state governments to actively participate in accomplishing such tasks. 
      Truth is we cannot continue to wait for government to do all of the job because leaving the future of womanhood in the hands of government alone is a risk too huge. As daunting a task as it is, we can still make an impact in their lives with each and every one of us contributing our own bit. 
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Nwasinachi Menkiti
    E-COMMERCE AND AGRICULTURAL COOPERATIVE SOCIETY

    Agricultural women cooperative societies are avenues to acess soft loans in agro-buisness, they can also be a platform for sale of the produce. With digital innovations in this 21st century, these cooperatives can sell their goods online through social media outlets and websites. But this cannot be achieved without exposung the women to digital literacy and e-banking. Has anyone being involved in such group and what are your thoughts on the participation of women in e-commerce?

    NWASINACHI
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Making e-banking available first in the community and setting up workshops to educate them on the use of e-banking. However in some parts of Africa , some go through the village heads or community leaders who in turn introduce it to the community. Here in Ireland there are so many concepts and investors are willing to take it on and sell it to banks. 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Uzoma Katchy
    Dear Prospective Champions, 
    It has been a wonderful experience knowing you all. A wonderful learning platform too.  As we move on in the journey of life, l have found this opportunity  an awesome privilege to interact with great minds.
    The lessons l have learnt here is already helping me to be more effective in my pursuits. I thank you all immensely for sharing and interacting.
    This is what DIGITAL REVOLUTION intends to achieve. We all are living examples to see and know that anything is possible.
    You are all Champions and l wish you all the best in  your endeavours.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      I have really learnt a lot from this group, the calibre of partcipants which are majorly women has showed the capability of women if given enough support . We are all champions!
      Nwasinachi
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Cagla Balcik
    Hi team, one nice example from a conversation with my friend about women's economic empowerment is how she started her own mortgage and how she actually found a mobile app for controlling her spendings. It was very inspirational how she improves herself even with supporting her knowledge with books related to financial literacy and figuring out how actually people misuse the opportunities. 
    I shared one story and one interview about the relevant topics and happy to have spent this time on this special and important topic, I learnt a lot. Interview is with a very successful business woman from Cisco, I'm sure you'll find it very inspirational as well.

    Cheers everyone!
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      The world is really going digital. Uisng apps to control spending can help in buisness a lot, I actually configured my banking setting online and am alerted when I spent the maximum limit I set. With that, am curteous of my spendings.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Srishti Bakshi
    Hi team I wanted to share my project outcome for skill development group, while I have posted in the story section, wanted group to give me feedback if possible. 

    https://goo.gl/rpjLJX

    Also my general question is - I have made a submission for this project and more in the stories section but how will Skill team at Empower women know that these beong to the skill development project deliverables. 
    • Valentine Kamau
      I suppose they will read and evaluate it. Also we signed up to the respective groups thus your contribution will match up to your name in the Skills Group members. 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Kinderfire or e-books are a great way of downloading books and reading them. Books that are not usually in the local bookstores can be purchased online, borrowed and read. Some books come only in e-books , digital literacy has come a long way in helping us access online reading . It also helps in creating global awareness like reading the news and magazines.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      Yes you're right. I read alot of books on Kindle by Amazon though they are not free. However, they are usually cheaper that paper backs but then it's important to note that for every good thing there is a price.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Maria Pedro Miala
    I have learned a lot with all of you too, I was so busy reading all of your insightful stories that I was not interacting much here. Thank you all.

    I think digital literacy and teaching people how to save is very important which is why I wrote this imaginary business in a blog in 2010: http://www.urgentevoke.com/profiles/blogs/likelemba-without-borders
    • Doris Mollel
      Very Right Maria , being in this globolized world we need digitallirecay spreading to ruralareas as much as we can drive grassroot campaigns. am sharing mine soon.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Maria Pedro Miala
    @Diana Rusu I just submitted my story.
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Dear prospective champions, may we not lose touch even if the rally period is over, can we connect on twitter @bodyglamz, facebook Ogbeyalu Udeala-okoye and Instagram Bodyglamz. It would be a great honor to connect with such an intellectual group. Thanks so much. 
    6 of 6 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Smart boards as a way of teaching is the norm of the day in the developed world. Not only does it reduce waste like non use of chalks, it also lasts longer and used in presentations. This is a part of digital literacy that is simple and easy to adapt. What are the means of teaching in your areas? Pls share Tnx. 
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Its unfortunate most schools in developing world are yet to adopt this. The situation in such countries are pathetic that they even study under the tress with limited resources. They still have a long way to go and the politicians should be held accountable for this .
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    What inclusive measures can be taken to include the mentally ill in the developing world in economic empowerment. Healthcare is an issue and a lot of mental illnesses are treatable with good healthcare but they are abandoned and made to seem worthless. Help can be accessed digitally to help improve their state of health. Also educating them through Skype or other digital means can be achieved through good healthcare. However are the governments doing enough?
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Exactly, if there is good healthcare first to treat them, then the chances to include them in economic empowerment becomes possible.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      The government are not helping.  But how can mentally ill patient utilise skype? They should be treated first, rehabilitated and then didgital literacy to make them useful to the society.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    In celebrating the International disability day . Women and girls who are disabled can gain from digital literacy. Lessons can be given via Skype  but they need a comfortable and adaptable environment to learn. Disabled women and girls are being overlooked in the developing world, in what ways can this be improved ? Thanks
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      It starts with weak legislation to support and protect them. Imagine a situation where a school , malls, places of worships are designed and built without considering the persons with disability in acessing such places. This hampers their integration in the society and even their ability to acess good qualitatuve education. In the developing world, special schools for these persons are very few and people had to travel thousands of miles to locate the special schools. I think at the global level, United Nations could step up and review existing treaties and conventions on disability to mandate member nations to actively support our brethen
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Lilian Ifemeludike
    Hi Guys,

    It's been a very educative and interactive session with you all. A huge learning curve for me. Reading several articles and posts from different people, absorbing multiple experiences, perspectives and insights has been very refreshing and revitalising for me. I look forward to working with anyone and everyone who is ready to push the interest and enablement of women forward. I also think we should have more often, such platforms where women and men as well can raise and share ideas.
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      Well said Lilian,  with combined effort we can all make our world a better place. 
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Yes Lilian thanks to people like you for making it fun and memorable. Hopefully we will all keep in touch. Cheers 
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Gee Chids
    The rate of child marriages is increasing.What can we do to encourage young girls to stay in school and follow their dreams???
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Education! Education!! Education!!! for both parents and young girls. Parents in rural areas should be educated on the need for their girl children to go to school. The girl-child should enjoy the same or even more amount of resources and energy for formal education invested on the male child because she is pivotal to the essential growth of any society. More girls must go, stay and remain in school and parents must see the long term value girl child education serves both to the girls themselves and them the parents.
      Mentoring sessions organised by women action groups or women development enthusiasts should be held in schools, churches and other cultural platforms. This motivational talk sessions will help young girls work towards remaining resilient and steadfast in the pursuit of academic endeavours. Girls like Malala Yousafzai are living proof that girls can defy all obstacles of education in their communities and become icons and bastians of female education. Such astounding testimonials will encourage and motivate our young girls to yearn and aspire for education instead of marriage or hawking.
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Educating their parents on the disadvantages of child marriage , health and economically would be a start.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      First, educate them on the importance of getting basic education and the positive effect it will have on them tomorrow.
      Secondly,let us project a continous campaign to communities to discourage child marriage.This can be done through religious and social organisations. This will make the men allow our girls to go to school and not marry them off early.

      Poverty is another problem that drives our girls to early marriage.Some families morgage their daughters to men who are willing to take up their responsibilities. Families should be encouraged to go into an income generation ventures,no matter how little. This will reduce pressure on the girls.

      Thanks.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Gladys,

      I believe that inorder to encourage girls to stay in school, we need to ensure laws that ban child marriage are implemented e.g. by reporting such cases if it comes to our attention or if we are aware of it in our community

      For girls who are easily wooed to marriage, we need to be mentors to them or ensure they have empowered women as their mentors.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Doris Mollel
    thank you
  • Hazem Essam

    The traditional “chalk and talk” method of teaching that’s persisted for hundreds of years is now acquiring inferior results when compared with the more modern and revolutionary teaching methods that are available for use in schools today. 

     It’s necessary to be able to teach and remain engaging. It puts a greater level of responsibility on creating lesson plans that truly work. Here are three teaching methods that are making an impact.

    Spaced Learning

    Teachers have reported amazing results when it came to Spaced learning . Spaced Learning is a learning method in which the condensed learning content is repeated three times, with two 10-minute breaks during which activities such as physical activities are performed by the students – I think, that PE and lessons can be combined.

    Spaced learning involves encouraging students to quickly switch through activities. For example, providing ten minutes of knowledge on the nervous system with a PowerPoint presentation and then having 15 minutes of basketball would be the way to get the better grades.The key is in the brain cells. It helps them to create the connections that they need to actually remember the knowledge. Furthermore, it has the additional benefit of allowing people to relax. If they are compressing sections of the syllabus into such small sections then there’s no time to worry. It’s all about the learning before moving on to another session of activity.

    Flexible Fridays

    Sometimes conventional lesson blocks just don’t work as every student is different and they all have their problematic subjects. The concept of Flexible Fridays is that an in-depth session of a subject can be acquired by simply having a whole day of mathematics or some other subject.

    At Flexible Fridays lessons a teacher try to help each student to study and learn what is the most difficult for him/her personally. Somebody repeats, somebody learns. It makes it more convenient for students as now they can focus on one thing while in school. It means that students don’t have a breaking point by spending hours struggling with a subject along at home.

    Teachers also find it easier as they can keep their lesson plans and simply go over them again with a more personal touch. Flexible Friday lessons are more in touch with students and gives focused study time that can help students grasp difficult concepts.

    Teachers are also able to aid students by simply having fast-track weeks. Having a whole week of mathematics or English can help students to get through the subjects in a shorter amount of time.

    It’s good news for teachers and students alike because even though a lesson lasts an hour it could actually lose up to 25 percent of its designated time. There’s the preparing for class and packing away to take into account, and students are not always the quickest at performing these tasks.

    Teacher should choose what method is more appropriate for his/her students: spaced learning or Flexible Fridays.

    Engagement

    Under a new teaching method called “engagement” students are urged to engage with the real world, analyze everything that happens in different life spheres (not only internship but also economic, business, social spheres, etc.). Business studies are where this new focus of engagement instead of conventional teaching methods, students were taken to visit local businesses where they were able to witness how the knowledge that they were learning applied to the real world.

    Multiple days were set aside for this practice and all students were required to wear business suits in order to attend. The idea is to get students engaged and to connect their learning to the real world. If teachers can show them how what they are teaching connects to the real world then their own brain cells are going to connect them and associate them.

    The results are there for all to see because before this new method was introduced only 40 percent of students achieved grades of A-C across both years 10 and 11. Under the new teaching method the institution reported that the numbers had shot up to a massive 91 percent of students achieving A-Cs in years 10 and year 11.

     


    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Thanks Hazel, flexible Friday is awesome, that way children can be in a relaxed environment and share their views. Thanks for sharing.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Hazem,

      Thank you for sharing the 3 modern teaching methods.  I particulary like the 3rd one of Engagement which can be used to impart financial literacy skills to students from a young age.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Mariam Negm

     

    Increasing Young Women’s Interest in STEM Fields

    With all the fast-paced technological changes occurring around the world, it is imperative to encourage young women to pursue careers in the Science, Technology Engineering and Math fields, allow them access to resources and highlight role models in these fields; did you know, for example, that the very first computer programmer was a woman? Ada Lovelace :)

     

    A couple of ways to get more girls involved in STEM would be:

     

    1.     Create early-year STEM programs for girls in elementary and middle school: This will inspire their interest from a younger age instead of selecting a STEM major in college. It would also make girls feel more welcome in class and familiarize them with how these subjects can be used in their life as well as to solve problems.

     

    2.     Implementing a mentor network: Having a mentor is indispensable for success and increased self-confidence. A network where successful, capable women in STEM fields are matched with younger girls would work wonders in increasing their involvement and solving the issues that might come up along their path.

     

     

    What else would you suggest?

    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      Awareness needs to be created in this regard. Young girls should also be stories of women who have excelled in the field of STEM , by so doing they will be encouragd to take up career paths in STEM. 

      If the gender divide in STEM is overcomed, it will also enhance career advancement for women. 
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Hello Mariam , the importance of STEM cannot be over emphasized. This should be incorporated in early school life to create a definite path for young girls.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Mariam,

      I like the ideas you have shared and I agree that more girls should be encouraged to take up STEM careers.

      In Kenya especially rural areas, girls are not exposed to as much information perhaps due to distance, culture and lack of exposure. Some of them dont know that careers in stem exist. Perhaps governments, women tech groups, etc can help organize special career talk days for girls and young women in rural areas to talk about STEM fields. Information is power.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      Parents should on their part encourge their girls too.I have discovered that many traditionally bound soceities dont support their girl-child to go for STEM courses in the school..I am saying this because i was a victim of such soceity.While growing up i have always loved to repair old electrical appliances and fix things.This made me desire to study electrical engineering and i must say the battle was tough.My parents felt it was a mans thing and i should just look outside that area.Well i spent 3years at home seeking for admission and trying to convince them.But finally i studied electrical and electronics engineering  and graduated as the best female student..The soceity,community and families should have an open arm towards girls going for STEM.
      Thanks
    • Doris Mollel
      Hi Mariam
      i suggest on programs to empower young girls from primary school on the use of what is around them that can be a usefull tool for develpment in additional to that parental and teachers workshops to enhance self reliance activities which will be fun,yet a way to reduce un employment to them that can lead to early pregnancy and early marriage especialy for Africans.
      innovative ideas will drive their sucsess
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Hello Mariam,
      This is an interesting topic.
      One of the ways to encourage  girl  participation in STEM,  is to  be creative in  addressing the subject. Storytelling can be a great way to pass on information so that it may not appear too technical for girls. 
      Adequate learning tools and learning resources will be of great help.
      Incentives  and benefits of a career in STEM   can also help.
      Mentoring/Role Modelling  too is very effective.
      Addressing some of their fears and biases in STEM and encouraging them to participate wil also help.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      I believe we need to bring down the cultural barriers and norms which keep women and girls away from STEm especially here in Africa. 
    7 of 7 Replies
  • Nuttah Mumbi
    Hi Prospective Champions,

    The rally is almost coming to an end. I must say it has really been a sacrificial three weeks for me as I am a quite busy person. I have had to stay up late in the night to review and participate on discussions, read stories and comment on them. I have also had to step aside abit from work just so I can attend webinars then thereafter resume work. I have also had to excuse myself from family chats because I have to do this. All in all it has been a wonderful experience taking part in the rally. Knowing that I was accorded this opportunity puts icing on my cake.

    How have you been able to manage work and staying active on the Empower Women website?
    • Juliet Odhiambo
      I have mostly managed by getting online on my phone while on traffic to work and from work and stealing a couple of hours from my shedule to upload a story or two.
      I also discovered a new mobile app GoToMeeting that allowed me to participate in the webinars while not necesarily having to stay put. That was a big one. All in all a great time.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      It was an eye-opening experience as well for me considering that I learnt different perspectives and ideas from people with different stories. The webinars were also exciting also. Everyday, I looked forward to coming on the rally and reading questions, commentaries and sharing my thoughts and experiences on the platform. We should do this more often.  
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Nuttah,

      I echo your words. What keeps me active in the Empower Women website is my passion for women empowerment and the need to connect with a community committed to improving the situation of women and girls worldwide.  

      It calls for alot of sacrifice as I have to commit my time especially the evening hours. However, I must say the experience has been and is still worth it.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      I usually come online after my kids have gone to bed,that way i can stay for 4 hours with full concentration.But really i learnt one thing,planning your time helps you to be more effective.I didnt know i can spend into the later hours of the night and still feel good.I learnt another thing,it is not just enough to have a passion for community development,one must compliment it with a drive and  zeal to break beyond her limits.
      Thanks
    • Doris Mollel
      Its  was 50 , 50   , but  fun to read , engage and share across the world. congratulations to all who managed . but am glad this platform enabled us to meet and discuss online
    • Mike Okonkwo
      As for me....it has been quite challenging for me because I hold a position in the office that requires my 101% attention and supervsion, communicating with colleagues and partners, giving feed back to donors on the progress of the project and at the same time, reading comments and also contributing to the rally. Thats is truly MULTITASKING for me. At first, I thought I wasn't going to handle the pressure but it turned out to be fun despite the time zones.

      Have learnt a lot from different people from different backgrounds and people with different orientation about how they view life. Its such a great priviledge and I must commend on Diana Rusu and the whole entire Empowerwomen team for their support and this opporutnity they have given to all of us.

      Its also great to see and know that a lot of people wants to empower the women all over the world and imagine if we all put our strength and determination to it, trust me, James Brown who sang "Its a Man's Man's World" in the year 1966 will come back to give us a remix of the song titled "its actually a woman world".
    • Nasra Hassan
      Hi Nuttah,

      Great to see all the great work you've put in. I've loved learning from so many accomplished men and women, I've felt quite intimidated at times because I've only just graduated and so many of you have had a lot of life experiences and work experiences but I now feel great about joining this platform and immersing myself in this experience.

      If I'm not chosen I'll definitely will still be using this platform and sharing with others also.
    7 of 7 Replies
  • Nuttah Mumbi
    Dear Nwasinachi,

    You have a good point there bu I only wish internet could be easily accessed in rural areas. In Zambia we have a problem accessing strong internet network in urban areas and it is worse in rural areas. So I think for that to be effective internet service providers should first invest in telecommunications infrastructure in rural areas.
    • Doris Mollel
      also lets try to use the knowledge we get to spred it to our rural areas and share.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Nwasinachi Menkiti
    DIGITAL DEVICE IN COMBATING PEST AND DISEASE PREVELANCE IN AGRO-BUISNESS.

    This is somehow technical but its easy if given the training and resources. Usage of digital devices like apps in smartphones could go a long way in boosting agric-productivity by helping in identifying diseases and pests in the farm and profer advice / solution to the menace. If the rural women in  agriculture are exposed to such digital innovation and taught how to use them, they could just match up the problems they observe in their plants leaves, animals body with the pictures in the apps and they could pinpoint the cause, problem & solution from the information in the app. The apps could categorise the disease based on the peculiarity of the region for easy acecss. What are your thoughts? How feasible is it to apply in rural settlements with low literacy level.

    Nwasinachi.
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Yes I think rural women could be taught but the issue is getting it across to them, mentoring and educating them for as long as possible before implementation. It would go a long way in boosting agricultural.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Nwasinachi,

      I believe it is possible to expose rural women to digital innovation that has the potential of improving their production throug disease detection. 

      In Kenya, we  have a TV program/ Initiative called Shamba Shape-Up (Farm Shape-up). The program takes various agricultural experts including agri-tech experts to many farms to educate farmers on the different technological tools, farming equipments, fertilizers etc they can use to improve their yield. In most cases, farmer are organized in small groups and are trained together based on their requested interests. 

      I believe women in rural areas can be organized into small groups and empowered on how to use smart phones as well as the app. They can also be ecouraged to purchase smart phones after the session as it will turn out to be an important farming tool for them. You will be surprised how fast they grasp the idea.
    • Doris Mollel
       Hi Nwasinanchi, use of apps its very good. very enagagefull but yo how many will it reach? women in our vi;;lages spend more time farming and other domestic work. my thoughts is a song sang in their local language to empasize on the problem and solution. i believe its the best way to touch them and understand benefits of the app lessons that will boost up their work. have a donor who will help develop app and know how best each citizen will be able to afford it.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Nwasinachi Menkiti
    DIGITAL LITERACY, AGRO-RESEARCH AND WOMEN EMPOWERMENT

    Knowledge and possession of digital devices aid in the improvement of agricultural buisness, helping in providing feedback to agric extention workers. If rural women whose main occupation is farming are equiped with digital devices and taught how to use them for eg android phone, apps could be used to collect information on their experiences via e-questionaire / survey. The data from such questionaire could be analysed periodically for agric research with the result used to improve the agro-buisness of such women which boosts their productivity and empowerment. What are your thoughts on this?

    Nwasinachi
  • Jessica Foumena
    Hello Everyone,

    A good resource will be the YouTube channel of Empower Women available here.  I copied and pasted the link below 


    Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS-vpf7lPSGrOyUU9u611lw

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Mike Okonkwo
    Please can a good samaritian put me through in uploading my story? Internet connectivity on point, computer device on check but to upload the story is neither on point nor on check. Thanks in advance to any good samaritian that will rescue me. Cheers
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Financial literacy has always been a tradition practiced years ago. From having a piggy bank from the age of five to using my mum's old discarded purse my parents taught me the importance of saving. I used 'komkom' (empty can of food) , anything that can fit my coins and notes were not exceptions. This was the beginning of my financial literacy. Share yours from childhood.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Mine was a small wooden box with a thin hole perforated on one side of the box, hidden under my bed and each time a family member or family friend gave me stipends, I'd throw the coin or squeeze the note into the hole. Each morning, I'd excitedly peep under my bed to make sure my little box was still there. Sometimes I'd shake the box in order to have a feel of how light or heavy it was (if heavy, it meant I was saving up a lot). This DIY savings scheme which was set up by my mother for me and my siblings become a very important aspect of our lives and with its proceeds, she would purchase our school kit and stationery for a new school term. It greatly helped me understand the importance of money - saving and the responsibility that comes with using it. 
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi  Ogbeyalu,

      I like your story. It is very familiar. Especially the piggy bank part. However, the fiancial literacy training that stood out for me from my parents was learning how to budget and save money.

      When I was sent to the shop, I was taught how to buy items for the house focusing on priority and where to make a saving.e.g buying 500grams of soap for 40 shillings instead of 300grams of soap for 30 shillings. I carried this knowledge to high school and later in my adult life. I have passed this knowledge to young people in my community.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      I used the same "komkom" to save money especially during festive periods like christmas which forms a reunion with family members that live a far and definitely you get tossed with cash and I put it in my piggy bank.
      Then when I started offering buisness studies classes in junior high, we learnt using ledger for recording income and expenses (debit and credit) and I drew a ledger on a piece of paper for my account ledger. Thats why education is also a good empowerment,  still utilise it till date. Learning to save, boosts profit because you are courteous.

      Nwasinachi
    • Mike Okonkwo
      Hahahaha@komkom.....that was epic and indeed a good flash back.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Peggy Tse
    Hi @Diana and @Empower Women team, I have submitted 2 stories to the EW platform. Just wondering if those have been reviewed and is there any feedback from the team? Also would the stories be published before the rally ends or after? Thank you! 
    • Diana Rusu
      Hi Peggy! We received all stories, all in our system. The first stories will go life today and one by one we will publish all of them after a careful revision. Hope it is helpful. Diana
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Yvonne Akoth
    Hallo Prospective Champions,

    I have heard this issue on my mind and would like to hear your views.

    What role can mobile network companies play in improving women's economic empowerment especially for rural women?

    Personally, I use online banking which is a partnership between my mobile network company and my bank. Using online banking helps me to save time and money. Sadly, their rates go up at some point and it becomes expensive making most women resort back to offline banking. I would love to hear success stories from your countries on how mobile network companies are contributing to women's economic empowerment.


    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      I think mobile networks as a coorporate responsiblity in improving the lives of its consumers could step up by giving out free data and smartphones to rural women as a way of empowering them. They can use the phones to make purchases online and transfer cash too.

      Nwasinachi 
    • Jessica Foumena
      In Cameroon, mobile banking is not yet very developed but I think it should be. The high rates are due to the lack of infrastructures and other elements. 
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      So helpful for female enterpreneurs. Placing an order on goods to supervising the arrival , getting alerts of money lodged and suppliers messages have made life a lot easier and has helped in boosting them economically.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Agnes Frederick Mgongo
    Dear Champions

    How do you approach finacial instiuion to give a cover story? Since I  apporoached my Bank for an interview but it is taking ages  to get an authority.

    Initialy was told to write an official letter but nothing has come back, Whats the best approach? Do you face the same?
  • Yvonne Akoth
    Hallo Prospective Champions,

    I have been thinking about this issue and dont know to what extend it can contribute to women's economic empowerment as far as financial literacy and digital literacy is concerend. 

    What role can mobile network companies play interms of improving women's economic empowerment? For instance, I use online banking alot. This is a relationship between my mobile network company and my bank. In the begining, I saved alot of time and money by using online banking. Once the rates's increased, I moved back to offline banking. Is there away we can address this situation especially for women in rural areas?
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      Mobile banking in a way is more convenient and has eased the stress of getting to the banking hall before making your transactions. You can do your transactions online without leaving the comfort of your home. 

      Most women in the rural areas are not digitally and financially literate and it's causing set back for them in their businesses because they still employ the archaic methods in carrying out their businesses.

      However, mobile network providers in carrying out their corporate social responsibility can organize training for women in the rural areas and can even team up with banks to educate women on financial literacy.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Agnes Frederick Mgongo
    Hello Prospective Champions!

    Empowering a women is  a passion, self driven and need a lot of dedication. If all these combined becomes beautiful and exciting.

    Am a Tanzanian woman who decided to dedicate my time and life in empowering women. Providing educational programmes and mentoring in ful filling their dreams! It has been a journey with lots of experience.

    At a time i had a though ... where i had to rethink and rethink how  can I reach out? i started organised sessions on Managing Finance and talked to them...my target group where  house wives who didnt had bank accounts.... I found movitivating as transformed their lives.

    God has given us with different talents, background and opportunities... How do we give back? Give knowledge and skills its priceless to give...https://www.facebook.com/Wezesha-Wanawake-Tanzania-1746343278923038/
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Hello Agnes, I am a mentor , I train and teach female entrepreneurs all over the world. It gives me great joy.
    • Agnes Frederick Mgongo
      I reach out different categories of women depending on the need. Not limited to young girls 
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Agnes,

      Thank you for the role you are playing in improving women's financial literacy.

      Which women do you normally reach out to? For instance, are they women in rural areas, peri-urban areas/informal settlements  etc? I would love to learn more about your work.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      That's wonderful, keep soaring.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Adekemi Adeduntan
    DIGITAL LITERACY AND AGRI-BUSINESS 
    Digital literacy has the potential for bringing out agropreneur spirit of women in rural and semi urban areas. Most women residing in the rural areas are farmers and are engaged in one form of agricultural activity or the other. 

    Food security is paramount for the survival of individual families and ultimately the nation. Access to information and communication technology poesses the potential to transform and promote agri-business.
     
    However, strategic application of  digital and financial literacy in agri-business offers the best opportunity for economic growth and poverty alleviation.

    In Nigeria for example, the only programme close to this was the one initiated by the former minister of agriculture, Dr Akinwumi Adesina who is now the president of Africa Development bank(AFDB) code-named Growth Enhancement Support Scheme whereby, farmers were assisted with inputs such as foundation seeds, fingerlings fertilizers as well as feeds. 

    The inputs were received by registered farmers from accredited agro-dealers through e-wallet programme between 2012 and 2014. The programme assisted to boost agriculture in Nigeria during the period. 

    However, I am of the opinion that a lot still needs to be done in the area of digital and financial literacy in relation to women in agri-business. How can women in agri-business be exposed to digital and financial literacy? Your opinions people. 
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      Hi Ugomma,
      Thanks for sharing your opinion and like I have said, a lot still needs to be done in this regard and it requires urgent attention so as to aid food security. 
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Adekemi,

      Thank you for higlighting the role of digital literacy in agri-business. I am glad that your government registered a programme where registered farms recieved input through the e-wallet programme.

      Just wondering, is social media as part of digital literacy contributing to agri-business in Nigeria? In Kenya, potato farmers from one of our counties..i.e. Narok County (know for potato and wheat farming) were using twitter to seek orders for potatoes by big hotels in Nairobi and to determine the market price. This is a trend that has been embraced by most farmers, especially female farmers and youth all over the country.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Hi Ugomma,

      I read your thoughts with relish. I love the points you raised. We have to start staring reality in the face and standing up to the occassion rather than initiating programmes and policies without seeing them to a conclusive finish. In Nigeria in particular and Africa in grneral, we often times, do not take into account, the realities on the ground - assess to electricity, internet, telecomunication gadgets and abilty for rural women to read and write. And if such iniatives must yield sustainable results for agropreneurs, we have to put in place the necessary tools, knowledge and abilities.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      First of  all you cant give what you dont have.I am also aware of that intervention by the former minister and i wished it was sustained.We have an issue with a long term plan,we are more concerned with the present result and forgetting that the world is moving.

      I think if we can start by addressing the fundamental issues of our country like power,technology and the facilities to do the training for these farmers,then we can be sure the idea will last.For example how can you digitally empower a farmer in a remote village in sokoto state who doesnt have access to light,internet and a place to address his challanges when the need arises? Are you just going to train them and then leave them to wallow in ignorance? it makes the whole thing meaningless.
       
      Like i said in one of my articles,we need to imbibe a sustainability concept,why the idea didnt survive was because of this sole reason.
      Solution-We can start by educating these women who most likely didnt gain any primary education.Start from there to build their interest in this new idea you are introducing to them.Trust  me adult education is a huge task and must be taken seriously with all patience. Remember over 80% of women farmers are in the rural communities,many of them never went to school andthey have taken farming as a traditional heritage. A large number of them are in the northenr part of the country where universal basic education is being addressed.You have to really come down to their level and reason with them.When you bring in a very technologically sphisticatated idea for their owngood,you must be ready to descend to their understanding,before you can see it work.
      Also we need to consider their location,do they have access to telecommunication,light and internet?  Is there going to be a central point they can reach out to in times of need? I cant give out a device to a farmer who uses local lantern and havent seen power supply in her community.
      In as much as we want to be digitally enables,we have to take one step at a time.

      People like you and i are the catalsyt that can champion this course,work together with private sector organisations who are passionate and willing to assist.While we wait for the governement to put in policies that will make it work,we as individuals can start from somewhere.
       Thank you.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Agnes Frederick Mgongo
    Women have so many needs... unplanned expenditures. Just wondering  where  and how do we manage!

    You will find a woman need to pay for kitchen party, bridal shower, haie saloon, buy new dresses, good shoes and attend all the occasions. While she doesnt have an activity to ean such huge amount of money... for sure its very bad situation.

    What is the best approch to empower thses women and transform this state?
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Like Yvonne noted, opportunity cost and scale of prefernce helps in priotising their needs. Spending within limit too.If someon desires to have all these social programs Agnes outlines, such person should be ready for empowerment for more cash income infrom of skills.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Agnes,

      Thank you for sharing the reality on the ground for a good number of women, especially young women who feel pressured to maintain a certain class or lifestyle. 

      I have friends and colleagues who enjoy a similar lifestyle and I alway wonder where they get the money from. I realized that most of them live in debt and the constant spending makes it worse.

      In my opinion, the best approach to empower these women and to transform their state is to inform them to priorities their needs instead of their wants.

      They should also be taken through formal or informal fiancial literacy skills by a professional or even a friend who will encourage them to know where to make savings or how to choose which events to attend and which ones to avoid in terms of necessity.

      They should also be empowered with business skills and ecouraged to have an extra source of income. I would encourage them to save frequently in a fixed deposit account where it would be difficult to remove money, and any change left will be stored in a safe place for future use.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      Women need to learn to prioritize needs before wants. I believe there is also a magical power in saying NO more often than not. For example in my country, Zambia, there is a trend where the bride makes a committee of friends and relatives to contribute towards her wedding. At times the minimum amount to contribute is so exhorbitant that if you feel you can't manage you had better excuse yourself. Unfortunately, many women would rather borrow from somewhere to contribute towards the wedding instead of letting the bride to be know what exactly is obtaining on the ground. 

      I therefore feel women should be taught that you spend using money that is left after you have banked your savings and not the other way round. Weddings and Kitchen Parties never finish. There are also baby showers, birthday parties, garden parties, thanksgiving parties, etc... If you are going to attend all these then I'm afraid you need an extra source of income specifically for parties.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      Empowerment must not financially defined most times.Some women need to be trained and educated on manage and live within their means.Yes  we women have so many things we want to buy or get at the same time,but  it is important that we draw a scale or preference,set your priorities right. There are things we can forgo for the present,whether a working clas or a business woman. doesnt have any source of income,then she should set aside her desires and work towards getting herself into a business or a source of income.
      If it a woman that

      That is why empowerment is a 360 degrees thing,it must cover every area of her life.One can organise a  management trainings,educate these women on how to handle their needs and wants,balancing their lives yet being happy afterall.
    • Mwabi Moyo
      Women should be taught on how to save money,how to budget, how to invest etc, and they should also be  introduced to those groups in which women contribute an agreed amount of money per month. And each one of them is allowed to borrow and use the money for various activities.
    5 of 5 Replies
  • Agnes Frederick Mgongo
    Hi  Everyone

    Can't post my stories, what is the best way.  I wrote in word document once  copied and past it rejects
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      I managed to copy and paste from MS Word and uploaded. I think the problem could be with the internet connection.
    • Mirabelle Abongwa
      Hello Everyone,

      I have the same problem with Agnes. Can anyone help?
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Sira Camara
    In senegal maybe things are starting to change but actions for rural women, left behind, are really scattered. We need to unify our strengh if we want to have a great impact. They now have their small businesses so they do know how to gain money but they spend all that money into their family. They don't know really know the concept of reinvesting so that to make their businesses sustainable and have others kind of ressources . Thus I think financial literacy combined of course with digital would be a great solution. 
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      Hi Sira, 
      In Nigeria, women who are into small scale businesses engage in "esusu", (daily contribution). By so doing, they are able to save their money and then collect the total sum contributed say at the end of the month or as agreed. 

      Teaching women in small scale businesses financial literacy requires a lot of patience and assuring them of the long term benefits and how financial literacy can make their businesses big. 
    • Sira Camara

      Dear Yvonne,

      That's a good idea but banks are not really accessible for rural women here. The costs are too high for them. Last year, a friend, Fatima approaches a group named ITER which 
      have successfully developed a microcredit system in The Gambia and in Senegal from which more than 3 000 female heads of households benefitted and get out from extreme poverty situation but also have become small entrepreneurs that enhance their socio-economic development. I already had a project (Lands of Hope) in the northern Senegal which aimed to help a group of women there (about 300) have generated revenue activities through market gardening. So my friend proposed to ITER a partnership to extend this system of community banking for women with whom I started my project in Northern Senegal. It really helps them. But our main issue now is that we have to go there every month for the follow up and it is so far from where we live. 

    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Sira,

      Reading from your country's situation in Senegal, I am glad that women in rural areas know how to make money through business and the only problem is reinvesting the money.

      If you know some  or one of the women, I would advice that you share with them the need to approach banks or saccos in the area who might be willing to offer free financial literacy skills and free business development skills. They only thing they might request is for the women to bank and/or save with them. I think that would be a good trade off. What do you think? Is it possible? This has worked well in Kenya where I am from. 
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Uzoma Katchy
    Some women in the northern part of Nigeria, are denied access of having a simple  savings  account in banks. Thry are equally  banned from interacting with the public.Some of these women engage in small business enterprises at home  and are eager to participate in financial  transactions. There is a large pool of resources available within their circle.With lack of  basic literacy skills, internet  access and digital tools, 
    How can these UNBANKED SEGMENT of women be reached? How can they be taught Financial  literacy?What obtains in your clime?
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Very important also, is the gender-regressive situation women face in most northern parts of Nigeria where a woman should not interact with a man who is not her husband, father or brother how much more owning or operating a bank account. Often times, she is not allowed to leave the house and if she must, she must go with a male company.
      In this socio-religious setting, people get to make decisions for her and these people are the male folk around her. This goes to show that if we want to see a shift in this mentality, we have to engage the men in these women's lives - the husbands, fathers and brothers. We need to educate them on the need for women to experience and enjoy the benefits of education (formal, digital, financial, health) without them, the male folk losing their male authority or ego as heads of house. They need to understand that their women will become even better wives, mothers and daughters if they are empowered with the right skills and tools consequently improving the quality of their homefront. The more men we are able to educate and enlighten in this cultural and religious setting, the more women we will empower.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Hello Yvonne,
      Thanks for your interest in this piece. It is not a policy issue but more of traditional and religious beliefs. Finding the solution will greatly help these women.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Like Ugomma noted, deep rooted traditional and religious practises are the barrier for such women participation in banking. Sensitisation could help to let them know the importance of allowing the women to engage in banking.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Uzoma,

      Many thanks for sharing this unique situation which some women in Nigeria are facing. If I may ask, what is the reason behind the women being denied access to having a simple saving account in banks? Is it a policy issue, a cultural issue or a social issue? It would be good to know the root cause in order for this issue to be addressed.

      If possible, please share more with me. I would like to be in a position to think and propose possible solutions.
    • Mirabelle Abongwa
      Hello Uzo,

      capacity building and start banking with traditional approaches like "njangi". communicate with them in the language they will understand.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      Hello Uzo, You have already answered it.provide them with basic  primary eduation,access to affordable internet and consistent and regular digital trainings . I will add this,there is need to break into the cultural and religious hindrances.Remember that Nigeria is deeply rooted in traditonal and religous practices.

      Bring in traditional approach in teaching them,understand their environement and how to break even..But dont stretch them beyond their abilities,else you will feel frustrated.Let them understand how their religion can help them embrace financial education.
      Thank you
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
       It all boils down to gender bias, gender inequality and unprogressive cultural practices.Why should women be prevented from relating with thier immediate environment.
      This can be tackled through cultural transformation in away that female folks in particular will be given access to formal education. 
      When you empower a woman, you empower the nation.
    7 of 7 Replies
  • Hazem Essam
    Anyone know what mean by Photographer & Videographer Credit  in  writing story  ? 
  • Rosemary Olive Mbone Enie
    Gender Extractives and Mining (GEM) Working Group Tanzania

    Salama Heritage Ecovillage (SHE) Tanzania in collaboration with Waridi Consult and other local and international organizations in Tanzania is leading the Gender, Extractives and Mining (GEM) Working Group to build the capacity of Women and Girls within the Extractives and Mining Sector. Today as the Executive Director of Salama Heritage Ecovillage (SHE) Tanzania, I had the opportunity to participate in the 'Going for Gold' Program in Tanzania. Tanzania is the 4th largest producer of gold in Africa approximately 23% of all people directly invovled in Artisanal and Small Scale Gold Mines (ASGM), are women. Going for Gold (GfG) is a 5 years program working towards economic empowerment for these women living in and around ASGM in Geita district of Tanzania.

    Under the Women Economic Empowerment (WEE) Program of SHE Tanzania and the GEM Working Group we hope to collaborate with Healthy Entrepreneurs, Simavi and Solidaridad to building the capacity of women within the Mining and Extractives Industry areas across Tanzania.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Rosemary,

      Are good mining practises with respect to the health and safety of the women in the extractive industries take care of too?

      Nwasinachi
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hallo Rosemary,

      I like seeing women involved in the extraction and mining industry. Wow..very impressive.

      It is great that all the people directly involved in Artisanal and Small Scale Gold Mines (ASGM) are women. If I may ask out of curiosity, is the community near the minining areas/sites, especially women and girls benefiting from the mines indirectly. E.g. offering free education, electricty etc? 
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Hello Rosemary, 
      Wonderful initiative. I think you can collaborate  with Neatness Msemo. You can create the CHANGE  in Tanzania.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Neatness Muze Msemo
    Well here in Tanzania especial in rural area it is still a cumbersome.Why I say this.because technology is still not well transformed we are still waiting to come.most of the people does not know how to use computers because of  the  infrastructure.Most of the education people live in city and old people or uneducative are farmers.
    We need to change our mind set and believe that we can change our environment if we real mean it.No body will help Tanzanian if we can not start to think in a positive way.
    Some are learning in a hard way but using phones,if you want to do something like print your letter,typing or scan you have to go far away to get that facility.by using Adroid phone atleast few people can interact with others globally.Social media is a best way to learn faster hope this rally will empower more women  from rural in future.

    women are very strong if many of them will be empowered they will be able to sell their products and get  exposure to expand ther knowledge and experence.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Neatness,

      I totally agree with you. I believe it would be good for women groups to work together  to lobby the local governement to invest in technology and internet for the local community especially women. There is power in numbers. That way, women will be exposed to digital literacy skills. It  starts with a few empowered women like yourself. 
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Hello Neatness,
      I think you should collaborate  with  Rosemary Enie. Both of you are  from Tanzania  and l think together you can create the needed change.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Valentine Kamau
    Financial literacy is needed to survive in thisn fast paced world. coupled with digital literacy this are basic survival skills one will require to navigate the world. This is women economic empowerment is so necessary.  
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Valentine,

      I totally agree with you. 

      In the recent past, many countries experienced fiancial meltdown and inflation. Some are still experiencing it today. It is for this reason that women need to have financial literacy skills in order to be able to sustain themsleves and their families. The whole world is going tech and all sectors are embracing digital platforms. Hence women should not be left behind on digital literacy skills as well.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Is the digital world ignoring the rural areas or are there issues that pose a restriction to it? Lack of power supplies in the rural areas is an example but electricity can be powered by generators, lack of affordability of buying data(wifi), what else can discourage or restrict the digital world from reaching crucial places to help empower women and girls? Opinions would be appreciated. Thanks
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Ogbeyalu,

      I agree with you that power is a major problem. But knowing Africa's tropical climate, we should invest in solar energy. This is catchin up in rural Kenya.

      Women in rural areas also need empowerment. In Kenya, there are some websites which can be accessed without data. I am part of a similar project which is being implemented by an organization called World Pulse working in partnership with Intel. I guess the honors is on empowered women like us to share this information. So far, I have reached two women groups.
    • Chioma Inyamah
      Power is the biggest problem. If the people in the rural areas can get access o solar power, this will be a starting point. Access to these communities is also another huge problem
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Digital technology  desires to capture everyone but there are some barriers for some women in different communities.
      In undeveloped nations, resources are scarce and poverty is extreme.
      Lack of access to internet,  non-availability of didital tools and language barriers.
      Most rural women in some communities lack basic literacy skills. 
      The use of Videos, DVDs in fnancial or digital literacy can greatly help and have a wider reach until these hindrances are taken care of.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Onyegbalu,
      How many ruarl farmers can power the generator? Best option is using renewable energy.
      Availability of digital equipments that would aid rural women in their enterprenuership and even training on the usage of the equipment are the impediments to digital literacy.
      Nwasi
    • Valentine Kamau
      Knowledge about digital literacy is also lacking in rural areas. If one does not know what the literacy is and how the literacy will help them then, there will be no zeal to learn it. 
    5 of 5 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Skype has been used for years now to run businesses all over the world. It can be used as a digital tool for women all over the world to start a business and run it from wherever you are located. It is an excellent way of authentic communication, you can see the person and talk one on one with the person. Skype has also helped in education, where a teacher is miles away but has a class online. You can learn a skill , educate and learn on a one on one or group basis It has also helped in bringing women together who under normal circumstances would not be possible. Digital literacy has helped in empowering women all over the world. 
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Ogbeyalu,

      It is true that Skype used to be the nom.

      But since  technology is always changing, plaforms like Whatsapp have become more accesible and easy to use. In Kenya, It has became quite effective for business. I am always on the look out for new plaforms that are user friendly and affordable for most women and girls.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Good initiative but may not work in some communities due to certain barriers and restrictions.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Ogbeyalu,

      The restrictions you noted in your earlier post could also hamper the usage of skype for the ruarl women. As a matter of fact, majority lack acess to skype.

      Nwasinachi
    • Valentine Kamau
      Yes Skype has revolutionised businesses and contributed to women economic empowerment.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Sadick Lugendo
    Here in Tanzania Go Digital busness yet is difficult to be implemented as long as technological level we are still improving from the lower level where we were. Education structure some other times is not static while restructuring and reformation is done for every five years terms.
      Womens are working hard in doing busness wake early and sleep late to night. Forexample womens walking around the street selling cassava groundnuts vegetabes boiled maizes and the same variables. When it cames on saving its difficut due to the types of busness which earn them very law income which sustain their dairly life provided that they walked all he day roaming the street trading but earn nothing.

    Women should be assisted with knowledges skills and material support to cunduct busness which will increase their income through this they can guarantee profit from their small trade actvities. Although there few succeed womens in our country and the world as well.
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Dear Sadick,

      What you have shared is true. This problem was noted by one of our banks, Equity Bank of Kenya where women can save as little as 50 shillings or 100 shillings a day. The bank was targetting people earning very little income who include those in the hawking business.

      Something else that has helped us in Kenya is that now anyone can access micro-loans of as little as 500 shillings to 70,000 shillings via their mobile phones. This initative was created to help those who cannot access a bank loan or living below a certain income level like the women you have mention. I thinks it would be great if this can be tried in Tanzania.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Some governments have not given attention to the needs of women.  It is worrisome that  the gender divide is deepening across all sectors.
      If this situation will be arrested, advocacy  groups ought to pressure governments to meet the needs  and rights  of women according to legislature and conventions 
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      I agree with you Sadick, 

      The amount of work women put into their small business does not translate to the output they receive at the end. 

      More structural strategies should be introduced to make it easy on them.
      Like instead of having this women walking all over;it will be good to have a market centre where there will be proper infrastructure with  toilets,kitchen and water. OR just provision of transport to central places.

      But I still believe that as we slowly introduce the business skills sets we can also bring in the digital literacy where possible.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Chioma Inyamah
    Do we have to empower women with only menial jobs and unprofessional skills? I think not! Women who have shown themselves worthy and powerful in high standing offices. As much as we teach women to learn skills and run small businesses, we should also understand that there are women who should be encouraged to pursue bigger dreams and career paths. As much as there are uneducated women who need empowerment, there are also educated women who have been subdued into redundancy. True?
    • Chioma Inyamah
      I know educated women-turned-housewives who could be doing much more than they are doing. Some finally decided to start businesses that are thriving really well. One in particular went from a housewife of 5years who was greatly supported by her spouse to one holding a high flying position in one of th biggest pharmaceutical companies in the USA. Now thats what im talking about!:)
    • Chioma Inyamah
      i know educated women-turned-housewives who could be doing much more than they are doing. Some finally decided to start businesses that are thriving really well. One in particular went from a housewife of 5years who was greatly supported by her spouse to one holding a high flying position in one of th biggest pharmaceutical companies in the USA. Now thats what im talking about!
    • Uzoma Katchy
      I think that there should be a balance in skills that women are encouraged to pursue.
      Sometimes, in undeveloped nations  simple basic and unprofessional skills have come to the rescue to empower women economically. 
      Many women have moved  on  from these unprofessional skills to train theiir children and  grow big enterprises.
      However, women should be encouraged to  pursue more professional skills if we are to bridge the gender divide. 
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Yes, its true. Some have been subdued through abusive relationship and cultural practises.Women empowerment could be boosted by support of the men too. 
      Mothers are the pillar of homes, if given the necessary support and skills could help in the development of a nation.
      I keep emphasizing that education is a great empowerment to breach the gap.
      I agree with ogbeyalu, the uneducated ones could be helped to learn skills. As a matter of fact, there are more uneducated / no skill women than educated nad skilled women.

      Nwasinachi
    • Valentine Kamau
      It is s sad that opportunities for well educated and qualifiied women are lacking. In this day and age,  a PhD graduate can be tarmacking. This has the negative result of making one cynical.
      As much as the uneducated woman is being empowered, more oppurtunities for the educated women should be created. 
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Yes I agree but there are more uneducated women who need to be given a direction on how to become financially independent by learning new skills and trades and would need great encouragement.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Thats true, I believe that innitiatives like #breaktheglass can help us to see more women reaching higher hights.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      Yes it's true. Many women would love to reach greater heights in education but can't because they lack funds and the drive.
    8 of 8 Replies
  • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
    It is amazing how our traditional saving systems can transform financial literacy and financial freedom.

    Here in Botswana one of the systems which is used especally by women from all walks of life is "MOTSHELO": this is a traditional saving's system, where member contribute an agreed amount either montlhy or just once off contribution and the returns are usually distributed by the end of year or the agreed date.

     I know in South Africa they call it Stovel. I just want to find out if you have the same system in your countries and share with us how effectiveit it is 
    • Yvonne Akoth
      Hi Gaofenngwe,

      In Kenya we call it Chama. It is so prominent that banks have actually set up Chama Accounts in their banks. Because of the progress it has brought to women's lives, men are also doing it nowadays.

      Through Chamas women have educated their children, bought/built houses, bought land and set up companies. It is a century old tradition that was in existence even in my grandmother's generation and will only grow to become better.
    • Chioma Inyamah
      Good point there Lilian Ifemeludike. And Yes, a lot of people in Nigeria use this as a means of saving/loan. I think if groups are educated better, they can turn this into a form of cooperative society. This will have more form and will encourage financial literacy
    • Uzoma Katchy
      In Nigeria, it is called  'isusu'. It has helped most businesses  to stabilise.It has equalled helped individuals to save up money for productive projects.
      I think that  further  enlightenment on Financial Literacy amongst these women group will help them multiply their monies and  be involved in other investment opportunities.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Yes, it is called "isusu" in Nigeria. It has helped buisness women so greatly in that it somehow a saving mechanism where someon uses the bulk saving for a meningful venture. While growing up, my parents uses it to offset our school tuition .
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Since most of us here,we seem to have this systems in our respective countries maybe we are the key to breaking the glass ceiling for the other women,who don't have any other commercial systems of banking either accessability or affordability .

      Maybe we here can all collaborate and do a bit of research,look at the challenges and as prospective champs we can develop a stragegy which can tackle this challenges so that this system can be transformed and still remain relevant to the less prevaledge and others.

      Any thoughts???
    • Mwabi Moyo
      We have it in Malawi as well. Here we call it village bank Or village saving loans.
      Its done both in villages and in towns. Many women are part of it.
      Such financial services have transformed lives of women. Women have been able to start up businesses. Some women even educate their children through village bank savings. 
      Its even much effective these days that people keep their money in the bank.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      This informal financial sysytem has existed for decades. In Nigeria, we call it several names, one tribe calls it Adashe while another that calls it Ajo. It is a system that has also helped women save up money and grow their businesses. However, this technique is quite ineffective as it has so many loopholes. Women sometimes, are not always able to meet with their payment obligation due to some unforseen situations like death, sickness or lack of profit. 
      Therefore, there is a need to show women better ways of assessing credit facilities and soft loans and how they can maximize these priviledges. In my opinion, rural women, women without any formal education and women from low income families should be top on the priority list as they are always almost in total oblivion of how to get started. When these women are equipped with the necessary financial education, we will begin to see an increase in the number of women excelling and thriving in business. This is because, in a country like Nigeria for example, where the percentage of rural and uneducated women is enormously higher than that of the living-in-the-city-educated women, we can only achieve Woman Empowerment in ernest, if we go down to the grass root.  
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Oh yes I completely agree. It has gone a long way to help start businesses for families who are not able to borrow from financial institutions. This goes a long way to set them up .
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      I will tryto look it up online to read more on SILC

      Yes this system,can be a bit challengin, like here people used to come up with unending stories when time to share the mony comes,then several if not all the commercial banks here developed services(savings accounts) just for Motshelo.So nowadays they open an account at the bank which attracts good interest for the members
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      In Zambia they call it SILC. This initiative requires people to deposit money and every withdrawal one makes is charged at 20% interest rate per month which I feel is expensive. Unfortunately, it's not ideal for those from poor backgrounds. Most people in rural areas would rather hoard their monies than deposit in the bank or any microfinance institution because of exhorbitant interest rates.
    10 of 10 Replies
  • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
    Fellow prospective champs, 

    Thank you for sharing your comments, personaly i wouldlike to read all of your comments and also comment on them.But the challenge is most of our comments are too long and this makes it difficult to read most of them.

    The sad thing is that we will end up missing out. So please lets make our comments a bit short and maybe continue give more info in an interactive way as others comments you can continue expanding and explaining more.

    I would also like to edge us to also respond to others comments,lets appreciate them and the effort they have put in sharing their thoughts with us.

    I hope i have not stepped on anyone's toes,if i have apologies.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      Hi Kabubi,

      I'm not sure if that's how others feel about the comments being too lengthy. However, I also like it when someone is brief but succint as well. I should be able to grasp the message being communicated in the most concise manner. Otherwise, I have no problem reading short or lengthy paragraphs as long as the message being conveyed is clear.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Faith Omollo
    Working on my story I realised most uneducated girls in Africa, Kenya to be precise, start out I'm business but when calculating their profit they don't add expenses e.g transport in the cost of goods and that's why their businesses stagnate. Maybe a little on cost accounting education would be helpful to these girls.
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      That's correct Faith not only in Kenya but also basically globally. I have seen situations in businesses as a mentor where the area is overlooked. Financial literacy would help in profit making by separating cost from profit and help one manage their resources well and correctly.
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      This is a common practice among those in agriculture. Very few take into consideration the time it takes for the crops to mature (time is money). Irrigation costs are also rarely accounted for plus the meals provided for the labourers. Packaging is also rarely accounted for. I like accounting for every expense I make not because I'm too economical but because it helps reflect the actual profit I'm making so that I don't over pay the government through tax.

      Your idea is very brilliant and must be implemented.
    • Chioma Inyamah
      That's so true. They need to be taught to keep records, not just in their hearts but proper book keeping and account of every expense. That way, they know what to expect every month after analysis. 
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Mike Okonkwo

    Addressing Poverty/empowerment through Digital and Financial Literacy:

    The great recession delivered a body blow to our country’s financial equilibrium, and only after years of painfully slow recovery have housing prices begun to stabilize and the unemployment rate steadily fallen. But while the economic crisis has abated, it remains a devastating morass for many, especially young adults, ethnic and racial minorities, and lower income families.

    Many experts concur that two of the challenges keeping people underserved, underbanked and underemployed are a lack of digital skills and financial literacy. Seventy-five percent of Americans live pay check to pay check and 25% have no savings at all; nearly half of all Millennials have too much debt, and many borrow from predatory lenders.

    Understanding how to make financially responsible decisions and managing one’s credit and debt are skills that are essential to our daily lives, without which people are vulnerable to the kinds of financial predators and poor decisions that helped cause the housing crisis. Financial literacy is critical to avoiding high levels of debt, excess fees for financial products, accessing credit and saving for retirement.

    Meanwhile, digital literacy is an essential component of being able to communicate with the modern world and access professional opportunities. Together, financial and digital literacy are vital tools to access financial and social services and achieve economic mobility.

    To empower women and also change bad habits, financial literacy push must go digital.

    When it comes to positive attributes, American like me think highly of ourselves. For example, we tend to think we're nicer than we are. We also tend to think we're more attractive than we are. As it turns out, we also tend to think we're more financially savvy than we are.

    Moving forward for women means mobile but a great analysis of data is useless if you don't have access to it at the right time. What we really need is information delivered in a way that helps us make measurably better decisions. That's where the second new quiver comes in: mobile.

    We're increasingly turning to our phones for money matters. Pew reported 35 percent of Americans engaged in mobile banking in 2013—up from 18 percent less than two years earlier.

     

    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Princess Olayemi I still believe that we can still do all this thing concurently,we need a holistic programming : if we have a program in book keeping lets also cover issues of openning bank accounts,digital literacy etc. 

      Last year here in Botswana we were running such a program for survivors of GBV,which was very effective and the ladies we were working with were so excited.


      Kelvin, even here in Botswana thats what we are seeing many people are now using cellphone banking even in rural areas.But I beleive the key in us achieving equity for women is to develop holistic programs which will look at an individual's need holisticaly and not in isolation.
    • Princess Olayemi JOLEDO-AYOMAH
      in Nigeria, if Financial Literacy shouls go digital over 60% of women would not be captured in the drive, as most of them are not literate enough to even do an ordinary ATM Transfer not to talk of internet banking. what we are still trying to do now is even make them open bank accounts and make simple book keeping a way of live. i know our counterparts in America may be way in front but we still need a lot of things before we can get to having Financial Literacy go Digital.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Manisha Kad

    My Ideas about women Empowerment at Organization 1.     Clear Empowerment Vision:

    We should have clear vision about strategy to achieve empowerment of employees irrespective of gender. We should take care of gender equality while focussing on women empowerment. It depends upon performance evaluation of each employee. Goals should be given to employee depending upon skills to be developed like leadership or decision making. That will depend upon current role of employee. Goals should clearly communicate with each employee.  The employee should be aware of what she/he needs to be achieved. It is observed that woman is lagging because of her personal responsibilities so preference will be given to women empowerment. 2.     Assignment of goals to employee alignment with organizational goals

    It is possible to empower all employees through assignment of goals. Every employee should have equal opportunity and same environmental conditions. Actions of person to be empowered need to be monitored to check its level of empowerment and actions required to enhance person’s empowerment. 3.     What need to be monitored during empowerment program:

    It depends upon what level of empowerment or role.

    • ·        Innovative thinking and Entrepreneurship skills
    • ·        Strategic decision
    • ·        Leadership skill
    • ·        Emotional Intelligence
    • ·        Methodology
    • ·        Interactions (communication style)
    • ·        People Management
    • ·        Output considering environmental conditions
    • ·        Team spirit

      4.     Assist when required

    While monitoring if we find employee ask for any help, assistance is provided to employee finding where she/he is lagging. 5.     Avoid politics

    We should create healthy environment at workplace so that employee will enjoy working with organization. It can be done through clear communication and transperency 6.     Evaluate the empowerment program with following metrics

    • ·        Development of employee in terms of skills she/he has achieved (will be covered in normal performance evaluation)
    • ·        Organizational revenue growth
    • ·        Organisational capabilities (in all area such as technology, Innovation, marketing etc.)

    I would like to have your thoughts.

    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Yes politics plays a crucial role in women empowerment regarding changing laws and legislations that restrict women in certain areas. Also more women being involved in politics is important to bring a much needed global change. 
    • Princess Olayemi JOLEDO-AYOMAH
      I find out it is not possible to totally remove politics from the day to day activities. avoid yes, but, can it be totally eradicated, No. i think we muct find a way to balance politics in the woirk place so that it does not become unhealthy.

      To evaluate Empowerment Programs, i think inovative and strategic thinking should play a very important role as it helps to be able to measure the impact the program has had on the participants.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    Where will books and newspapers and magazines be in 10years? With the internet and kinderfire, everything is done online. From ordering newspapers online to reading novels online, down to ordering pizza and curry for dinner. Has digital literacy turned us to lazy beings or has it made us realize that tasks can be simple and easy? Will newspapers go out of fashion or do we still love the feel of the paper that allows us glance at stories we love but never would have thought of? Your thought beautiful people. Thank you. 
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Online publication is "going green" and environmentally friendly, it has not turned us lazy.
      Yes, we can bring internet to the rural areas. Government can enter into partnership with private investors to give opportunities to the rural dwellers. This would definitely transform live.

      NWASINACHI
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Thanks for your comments. How possible is it to bring internet into the rural areas? Anyone living in the rural area?
    • Nuttah Mumbi
      I like to think that being "lazy" makes you invent creative things. Somebody out there invented a remote control because they didn't want to stand up each time they  felt like changing the TV channel. I live on the Copperbelt Province of Zambia where most mining activities take place. Today most mines are higly mechanized because having people dig copper manually is not as productive as using machinery. Zambia's GDP depends largely on copper production and so it's only logical that modern mining systems are adopted. The recruiting process of employees is now less tedious because all you have to do is apply online and a software which looks for specific words in resumes will do it's job. Advancing technology is the way to go.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      I also like the feel of a hard copy,but the chaallenge we are facing of environmental degregation i beleive we need to let technology to take the driver's seat.

      I believe we should be deliberate in how we do things like have areas where printed newspapers are not allowed and have other places which are remote to have printed newspapers or magazines.

      I don't think digital literacy has turned us to be lazy but i would say SMART. 
    • Princess Olayemi JOLEDO-AYOMAH
      i live in a village where one does not get to read the daily newspaper untill late afternoon. Where internet is 'Facebook' for the Avarage Youth. Who have never tasted Pizzas not to talk of ordering one online. Whose Breakfast is 'Amala (Yan Flour Meal) before heading to the Farm or Markets. But I find it exciting when i travel to see the easy at which the things you talk about here is and I marvel at the Gap in everything. My Thoughs

      1. Yes, Digital Literacy has turned many into lacy beings, not because they have everything at thrre fingertips but that, they naturally would not make the effort in the first place. even if as it were, no internet existed they would still find it difficult ordinarlly to read.

      2. Yes, life becomes easy when one can do a lot with a click. You should have more time to do much more than one will nomally do without the Internet. Making work 24/7 a childs play. So inverably, one can work round the clock with the Internent and be able to achive more.

      3. No. Newspaper may not go out of fasihion soon as, personally i love the feel of paper on my hand, i still buy the paper when it come even when i have read it unline, this is because i used it as a refrence tool as i may not easily access the one on the net asd easilly as the hard copy
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      It is without doubt that online materials have fast overtaken hard copy books, journals, magazines and newspapers and will continue to evolve in so many ways that we cannot imagine in the forseeable future. With the rate of divergent, innovative and creative thinkers on the rise, we will continuously experience a high level of sophistication in the technology, communication and information industry. 
      As a result of this progessive evolution, there is a high need for more and more women to actively participate and partake in digitization. Women, especially in rural areas must be exposed to this exciting, efficient and effective way of assessing and engaging with online human and material resources that will expose and improve their businesses. Taking advantage of this tool means that women will begin to "work smart" instead of "working hard" causing them to drastically reduce expense and stress levels which will enable them live healthy and prosperous lives.
    6 of 6 Replies
  • Ogbeyalu Okoye
    www.digitalliteracy.eu DIGITAL LITERACY SURVEY :Available in almost 20 different languages, the survey helps you find out how digitally literate you are. It consists of variety of questions on common ICT tasks and identifying new tools. This has 37 questions and takes approx. 5-10 mins. Just click to start.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      Thanks for sharing. this can serve as a test for learners.
    • Nwasinachi Menkiti
      Wow, just submitted the survey. Nice!
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      I took the survey and I enjoyed it. It gave me an insight as to how digital literate I am plus it's simple and fun. Thanks for sharing. 
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Adekemi Adeduntan
         DIGITAL LITERACY
    Digital Literacy is the ability to use digital tools and facilities to access digital resources. It involves the use of digital devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops.

    Mobile phones are user friendly and users can operate easily without much complexity. The mobile phone is the most popular way to connect the internet. 

    Digital literacy enables anyone who is digitally literate access the entire world with so much convenience. For women in particular, digital literacy will move them away from the age long traditional believe that men are superior to women and that their world begins and ends where they physically reside.

    Empowering women is beyond just giving them funds to undergo training, acquiring skills and even start up a business. It also requires making women digitally literate. 

    Women are not taken seriously and their professional views, opinions and advice are not regarded as valuable as those of their male counterparts. It may be ignored and only accepted after a man validates it.

    The solution to the forgoing is for women to over-prepare for meetings and remove the fear of technology so that they will be able to explore the internet and obtain resources that will propel them in their endeavours. 

    For women in business, digital literacy gives them the opportunity to reach out to a wider market and how to go beyond the known limited circle of customers. 

    Digital literacy remains one of the veritable tools in achieving the goal of equal rights and opportunities for women and girls. It's important for women to be digitally literate so as to economically independent.
    • Lilian Ifemeludike
      Digitization is a beautiful thing for women in business as I am a beneficiary. But we must agree that this pie hasn't gone round at all. A lot of women in rural and sub urban areas have still not been properly exposed to how they can take to their advantage, the perks and benefits that come with this trend and how it can help them sell their products and services to a large scale of customer base. We, the women who have learnt, tested and trusted digital tools have to step out of our comfort zones to enlighten women who do not have as much information as we have. We must begin to show them hands on, the basics and simple ways to use information technology to achieve big things for their ventures.
      The bitter truth is that if we don't do it, no one will do it, (the male folk are not ready and never will be ready to do it, save for a few of them which will not be enough) and come 2030, we will still be singing the same song. Women training women is the fastest and most effective way women can be empowered.
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Digital literacy has gone a long way in making life easier especially for women who are in school or business. I completely agree it takes away the fear of technology and gives women confidence.
    • Uzoma Katchy
      The importance of digital literacy cannot be over emphasised and  this is the reason why  women must be involved so that they can benefit from the opportunity. 
      For women in business,  the POS, has been of immense value in cash deposits and has enabled these entrepreneurs to keep track of their money.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Uzoma Katchy
    Rural women learn things through simple ways.Financial literacy can be taught in a simple way  to a rural woman through  the use of piggy banks.
    I met a woman recently who had been denied opening a bank account. She has a small business enterprise. Thtough the use of piggy bank, made from recycled milk can, she has been able to  put money aside for investment and  personal savings. Her business is also thriving .
    What a simple  way to learn and practice financial literacy.
    • Adekemi Adeduntan
      It is a traditional method of saving. and I am aware of a lot of women who have been able to save through this means. However it requires a lot of discipline.
      It must be stated that development in the financial sector has gone beyond this in modern times. How could money saved in a container in corner of a room attract interest  compared to one save in the conventional bank? 
    • Tendai Chidzero
      I have come accross two women with a similar story, but  they use recycled soap cartons.

      They have disciplined themselves: specific amount to drop in everyday.

      Indeed a simple way to learn and practice financial literacy.
    • Joshua Aguonye
      I think most of the banks have introduce the "Ajo" idea for local market people through their marketing deparment to assist the Market women and Illiterates to be able to run a simple bank account... But the problem I have is the defrauding of those women by marketers because many of them can't really tell if the money was actually depositted into their account because some of they are not upright people and once they see that those women don't know how to track the transaction, they start diverting the money.... Am saying this because i have a several real stories on how insurance markets did same to many of their clients by eating their premium. 
    • Ogbeyalu Okoye
      Amazing story. Also the contribution technique is now used more often than not to start a business and help save for rainy days. It is also  a way of banking as money contributed by various women is given to one person and eventually goes round the group each of them benefiting greatly from the bulk put together. 
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Reuben Aubee

    Creating avenues for women to empower themselves should be a top priority of every government. It is sad to see some women depend on men for financial prosperity because their culture and religion forbids them to fend for themselves. Also, lack of job training and lack of resources has been an issue for women in some communities. I have been lucky enough to partake in discussions where women have given account of similar scenarios. In a dialogue I attend a while back at my college, the guest speaker talked about how she had an engineering degree, but could not work due to her husband and her culture. To simply put, she had been relegated to the level of a housewife. To clarify, being a housewife does not connote a bad thing. This anecdote is my way of saying that women are immensely instrumental in the economic development of any country and should not be subjugated to positions that fails to uplift them economically. Growing up, I never imagined women as Mechanics, taxi drivers, plumbers, electricians among others. I had been made to believe that these professions were mainly for men. This all changed when I started to see women engage in these professions as means of sustaining themselves and their families. The shock of my life was when I boarded a taxi (In Nigeria) and saw a woman behind the wheels. I was out of words. What I have learned thus far is that if the necessary resources are provided by governments, then women can pursue professions that will sustain them in the long run and eventually expand into bigger businesses. Small scale businesses are instrumental to the growth of every country. You would be surprised to see what a woman hawking food items on busy highways can do with proper resources and training. In a nutshell, providing financial backing and skill training can help empower and sustain women.

     

    • Uzoma Katchy
      I agree with you  Reuben women are good money managers  and  are willing to learn and try out new things. Encouraging them to acquire financial Litracy will further help them learn new savings and  investment options.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Nuttah Mumbi
    The construction industry is one of those that really depend on skills development. It is a very old field which actually employs more semi-skilled and unskilled people than any other industry. As a Civil Engineer qualified for this particular industry, I chose the Skills Development Group because it's what resonates more to me. I own a blog which I feel will serve me right as a tool for disseminating information concerning my industry. Financial literacy is a very crucial issue in the construction industry especially to contractors. I feel it's one aspect that really needs attention. I have been Assistant Director of a Construction Contractor since 2012 and I know the importance of financial literacy for our personnel.    

    This is truly a great platform for learning and interacting.

    #Patiently waiting for the webinar to start now.
  • Diana Rusu
    We are staring the webinar in 5 min https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5471995972035933188 join now!