Q&A: 2016-2017 Prospective Global Champions for Change - Business Development Group

Dear Prospective Champions, 


This is the e-discussion thread for Business Development Group. If you have a general question, please add it and discuss it in this forum. We would like to encourage support to and collaboration with other contestants. Only with working closely together, we can all win.    

May you have a fun and educative rally! 

The Empower Women Team  

Relevant Tags:

Concepts of WEE
  • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
    https://www.facebook.com/TheIndependentOnline/videos/10153996943201636/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED 

    have a look at this video that talks about the discrimination against women who are not married by the time they are 25. Truly a great video
  • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
    Hie World Changers. I am writing a report on the 16 Days of Activism on violence against women and children and it will look at the influencial factors that are opposing the efficient progress for women to leave abusive situations and one of them includes education. Please take a lovely 3 minutes to do it and  be part of this report in your own small way.

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/X8DH6VR
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Adina Laura Achim
    Where should we look for the winners? Thank you
    • Deepa Pillai
      Hi Adina
      I think you may have already received the email. Here's the list and congrats! 

      https://www.empowerwomen.org/en/who-we-are/news/2016/12/empower-women-announces-the-2016-2017-champions-for-change
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Eri I

    For example in UK, from April'2017 there will be nowhere to hide as every large employer will have to publish their gender pay gap and gender bonus pay gaps.  Until then, and to get the ball rolling, the minister for women and equalities J.Greening has unveiled a tool to help us find out the size of the gender pay gap by occupation.

    The online tool, created by the government and the Office (ONS), shows that construction and building trades, and financial managers and directors have the highest gender pay gaps.

     For construction and building trades supervisors the gender pay gap is 45.4 per cent in favour of men. For financial managers and directors that figure is 36.5 per cent. On average women are paid 7.2 per cent less than men in journalism.

    The April regulations will affect almost 8,000 employers with around 11 million employees and shine a light on workplaces practices that could be preventing women from reaching the top in their organisations.

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Grace Pisirai
    #16DaysOfActivism i would like to share

    "Getting Muna back on her feet" https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2016/12/getting-muna-back-on-her-feet 
  • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
    I have a report I am doing based on the 16 Days of saying No to Violence against Women and Girls. would be lovely if you guys could answer the following questions to help me out. Thank you all.

     I love reading so feel free to type away: 1) Has education always been a priority for girls in your area and why?
    2) can educating girls lessen their chances of ending up in an abusive relationship
    3)why are some societies still ignorant about violence towards women and girls
    4) do we have enough resources online to offer girls in need the education they need
    5)how are you working on improving gender equality in your area? 

    #BreakTheGlass
    • Ugomma Ogu
      My answers..
      1.Education is a priority in my area now,many parents are allowing their daughters go to school and the government too is trying with free education.
      2.Yes,when you are educated you are informed and knowledgeable to understand life.It will give her the opportunity to define her grounds and seek quick solution in any abusive relationship.
      3.Reason is this;culture,tradition, religion,under-development and lack of guidance fromwell exposed persons .
      4.We cant say the resources online are enough until we access them,also as for the girls in rural areas online education is still a challange because they lack basic computer knowledge.
      5.I am doing a reading campaign for girls to help them understand their place in the soceity, i have created a primary school program to educate them on gender equality which involves the boys too and currently i am working with local religious bodies to make sure women are treated equally;because religion is a strong tool in my country.
    • Grace Pisirai
      Hi Munashe

      Good survey. 

      1. Education is  and has been a priority in my area to most of families, because they have long  embraced the 50:50 opportunities to their kids regardless of sex and it has become a  way of life  and not just in education but also when it comes to inheritance. 
      However, there still remains a part of society that has been resisting change, to mean they have now and then actually been approached by Womens Associations and the government but still remain adamant. To them, they give away their children in marriage at early ages and so what is the point of educating a child for the benefit of the other family. The belief that a girl child is an investment from which they one day will have to gain from and also that  a womans role in society is procreation has hindered empowerment of women and gender equality.

      2. To acertain extend educating a girl does lessen chances of being in  abusive relationship. i am assuming there is no financial dependency yes. 
      But there a thing called love i want to bring out, i have seen many educated women, financialy dependent, aware of their rights to live peaceably, aware of their of choice to choose to leave or divorce but they holding on because they love the person. Hence, it is cases like these that support initiaves  advocating for involvement of men in the fight against GBV

      3. Well i think  for one, it is a matter of perspective, to some societies what we call violence is a normal way of life, women should be disciplined.  Two maybe women and girls do not speak up, they have no voice to air the challenges they face. So i feel culture and societal values comes to play here.

      4.i think there is quite a lot of online resources though i think there is no limit to how much could be put up. However, i feel the challenge is in access to technology and knowhow on how to use technology especialy in some very remote undeveloped areas.

      5. and the million dollar question, my work has been in encouraging friends, family, students, part of my duties is recruiting and mentoring students on attachment at the company i work for and on recruitment we follow a gender equality policy to employ as many competent women as men. I also assist my friend, a single mother with fees for her girl child in school and with projects she will be doing to raise income. i am also a member of Zim Women In Engineering but i still feel i can  do more in improving the lives of women, hence my participation in this forum
    2 of 2 Replies
  • George Hashaka
    Women empowerment can be attained with the realisation of gender equality,relative to this discourse in the global arena I have found two interesting arguments about Unsexing or Super-sexing the "Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women"(CEDAW).On this subject read an article by Professor Darren Rosenblum titled "Unsex CEDAW,or What's Wrong With Women's Rights" and another article by Berta E.Hernandez titled "Unsex CEDAW? No! Super-Sex it! Google search for these articles.

    I hope you will find them interesting and very enriching on this discourse about gender equality and women empowerment. 
  • Eri I

    Did you know that only around 17% of notable profiles on Wikipedia are of Women?
    Source : BBC
    Soo, 100 Women are partnering with multiple global outlets at the BBC and the Wikipedia community held a 12-hour edit-a-thon on 8 December, to close the gender gap.  15 events in 13 countries happening in multiple languages to grow the number of female editors and to add women who you think deserve to be recognised.
    Both women and men can take part in the event, either on your own computer, or at the BBC's London headquarters in New Broadcasting House, where you will be trained in editing by volunteers from Wikimedia UK.
    How to become a wikipedia editor ?

  • One of the best ways to reduce malnutrition at the level of the household is to diversify diets and inclusion of underutilised species across value chains.

    We could take for example small grains right from their production to consumption.

    How can we innovativEly address nutrition/ relevant capacity building at each level of the value chain?

    Any insights??????
  • Ugomma Ogu
    This is a new trend i have noticed.More women are becoming the bread winners of their families....is this true? is it applicable in your country?
    • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
       I would say it is bitter sweet to be honest. On one hand, in developing countries women are becoming breadwinners because they are fighting for their place in the workplace and have earned it too ( kuddos ladies) but on the other hand, we have 3rd world countries like my country of birth Zimbabwe where 90% of people are not formally employed , and best believe this , when times are hard, at times women will carry the heavier burden and the men don't do much because we have different levels of compassion even in business. No I am not attacking men by the way, I'm commenting based on what I saw when I walked the streets in my country a year ago when I was there - whereby some men would be drinking the locally brewed alcohol at 10am by the street side while the women are sweating already setting up their little tables to sell bread they made the night before or fruits and veggies.

      Women are compassionate even in the business industry. I saw women working hard to make sure that they have a few dollars to take back home. This does not serve to undermine men but this is to show the differentiation on how women are becoming the bread winners based on their social and geographical setting. 
    • Grace Pisirai
      True, very applicable of my country.

      For one women are becoming more empowered, we see more women represenattion in industry than before and some even occupied leadership positions such that their contribution to thefamilies become even more significant.

      Also the continued economic challenges we are facing, and increase in rate of unemployment, the number of street vendors  and cross border traders is escalating everyday, 90% of them being women working hard to provide for their families ,help reinforce their husbands low salaries. In other cases the husbands are completely out of a job, to proud to work say in vendoring. However, with women there is no ego holding them back, they are not embarassed of not doing a white colar job like man, what is more important to them is survival of their families. 

      Prompting this is also increase in divorce cases and run away dadies, leaving women as primary breadwinners for their families.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Ugomma Ogu
    Girl Education-The role of Women

    I will like to share a current true life story of a 10 years old girl who got pregnant with her first ovulation ( menstral cycle).This girl lives with her mother and younger siblings.She just entered secondary school last september.I was so woried when  i heard her mum beating her and shouting at  her for bringing disgrace to the family.I realized one thing-Mothers have a very big role to play in the lives of their daughters. The following are my finding;

    1.In most deeply rooted african homes,parents especially mothers dont discuss sexual education with their daughters as they are growing up.
    2.Most of these girls feel so insecure to discuss their challanges from the opposite sex with their mum,out of fear they keep quiet.
    3.Some traditional practices forbids a girl to raise any sexual molestation to the community,she will be termed as being disprespectful.
    4.When women refuse to bring the young girls closer as a mother,they end up learninng from the outside world which most times mislead them.
    5.Many girls are not taught thoroughly and informed about  sexual orientation in school,especially in public school where they are overpopulated .
    6.The young boys have been totally left out of the picture of things,because when they too are not guided they become the trap for our young girls.

    Mothers are scared to talk to their daughters,many of them dont even know how to go about it..but deep down them they are worried.We have to encourage a mother-daughter bond.This will go a long way to address any impending problem.

    There is need for our girls to be educated ,guided and  informed.Many of them in rural areas dont even understand their body makeup,basic health information and general well-being. When this is lacking,we end up having a soceity filled with teenage pregnancy,sexually transmitted diseases and many young girls who cant complete their education.
    I think our culture shouldnt be so strict to the point of imprisoning us and denying us the freedom we desire,to speakout and allow justice to take its course when a victim is identified.
    This particular case is one out of thousands we have out there.

    Our young girls need guidiance and it is our duty to give it to them.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      Currently this trend have been seen as a norm in some soceities.What i have started now is to talk to girls in my neighbourhood,women who live around me and my religious members.Funny enough many of them gave a listening ear and out of shyness saw reasons in what i told them.I promise to continue the discussion and help them bond with their daughters.And as for my daughters,i have chosen to make them my closest friends and help them be open to me.If we all can start by talking to our sisters,daughters and women friends on the need to be close to their daughters,i think we can achieve a great result.
    • Grace Pisirai
      I totally agree with you Ugomma, we have to encourage a mother-daughter bond.

      I can add situations as mothers who watch their daughters rapped by their fathers, stepfathers but still keep quiet about it and worse also bid their daughters to keep quite out of fear of communities reaction to it or fear that their husbands will leave them. Women in difficult economic situations forcing their girl children into prostitution, the mother becomes the pimps and her own daughter the whore.

      I believe women empowerment  starts with us women empowering each other.

         



    • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
      Dear Ugomma. Could i please use this as part of my Case Study Report based on why women and girls are not fully being emancipated form the issues they face. This will be a contributing factor to the report based on the 16 Days of Saying No to Violence agaisnt Women and Girls Campaign which is always celebrated in December. The report should be ready before Christmas and I will def share with everyone in this group too. I will be sur eto give you credit ofcourse :)
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Eri I
    As per www.globalissues.org :

    Nicaraguan Women are requesting Access to Land not Just on Paper .

    A group of women farmers who organised to fight a centuries-old monopoly over land ownership by men are seeking plots of land to farm in order to contribute to the food security of their families and of the population at large.
    Members of a cooperative of women farmers in Nicaragua build a greenhouse for thousands of seedlings of fruit and lumber trees aimed at helping to fight the effects of climate change in a village in the department of Madriz.

    Matilde Rocha, vice president of the Federation of Nicaraguan Women Farmers Cooperatives (Femuprocan), told IPS that since the late 1980s, when women trained in the Sandinista revolution organised to form cooperatives, access to land has been one of the movement's main demands.
    According to Rocha, as of 1997, the organisation has worked in a coordinated manner to fight for recognition of the rights of women farmers not only with regard to agriculture, but also to economic, political and social rights.
    Femuprocan, together with 14 other associations, successfully pushed for the 2010 approval of the Fund for the Purchase of Land with Gender Equity for Rural Women Law, known as Law 717.
    They also contributed to the incorporation of a gender equity focus in the General Law on Cooperatives and to the participation of women in the Municipal Commissions on Food Security and Sovereignty.
    For Rocha, this advocacy has allowed rural women to update the mapping of actors in the main productive areas in the country, strengthen the skills of women farmers and train them in social communication and as promoters of women's human rights, to tap into resources and take decisions without the pressure of their male partners.

    "For rural women, land is life, it is vital for the family; land ownership and inputs to make it productive are closely linked to women's economic empowerment."

    • George Hashaka
      I salute the women of Nicaragua!They have been at the forefront of bringing positive change in their country but also through their achievements,they are a motivation of change to women all over the world.Way back in the 1970s they played a crucial role in bringing down the Nicaraguan government of dictator Anastasio Somoza in July 1979.

      So are the women of Iceland who went on a peaceful sit down strike both at home and at work in 1975 and demanded for equality. Later one Monday after their month's pay the women employees of Iceland,stopped working and went home demanding an increase of their salary.

      The struggle continues,we all have a role to make this world much better than we found it and women empowerment is key in the attainment of this noble vision.

    1 of 1 Replies
  • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
    Hello all,yes the really is offer but the job to emacipate women is still on,i will still work with this wonderful groug to ensure that every willing woman and girl is empowered,its been an amazing experience!!!!
    • Dhara Patel
      true. rally is over , work is still going on to reach to the dream. 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Juracy Johnson


    HELLO ALL!

    Since all of the participants from Mexico agree that we still have a long way to go in gender equity, we also agree that it has to start in schools. 
    The fist step we could take is to go to schools and have talks and conferences with parents and teachers of students. It is a must that we start in elementary school and tehn work our way up to Universities.

    Among us we can start a brain storming virtual session and develop a plan and involve teachers who want to support us in this sense. Would you like to participate? Please leave a message here .
    We could make a Facebook group! Sincerely, Juracy
    • Juracy Johnson
      Thank you both! Jessica I can't find you on facebook. Oriana I sent you a friend request.

      Let's start a group and then we can add more women interested! Juracy
    • Oriana Mansur
      Dear Juracy, 

      I'd love to be a part of your project! Although I'm not from Mexico, I'm also Hispanic and have experienced the machismo that is so prevalent in Hispanic countries. Feel free to add me on Facebook or Linkedin and keep me updated with your ideas!
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro

      Hello Juracy, great initiative!

      I'm completely agreed with you, the change that we want to see, needs to start at school from the basic education to university.

      I suggest that first it is necessary to have a talk with the kids and try to explain that gender is not a situation that could define your way, what I'm want is try to break up with the perception that we have about genders.

      But also it is necessary to give talks about women violence, and try to help to understand the community that violence against women is not normal, and everyone need to be respect.

      Also I think that is important to give talks but also crate programs in the communities, because as we know the most vulnerable women are in this part, so it is necessary to make workshops where we could help families to respect women and promote the tolerance between us. In my opinion, I think these two ideas are so important to implement because we are facing a big problem because of our culture and ideologies.

      I'm very happy to find a person who has the same beliefs than me, thank you very much.

       

      The best,

      Jessica Muñoz

    3 of 3 Replies
  • Ugomma Ogu
    Good morning all,

    I am happy that this past weeks has been very engaging,eventful and encouraging.I have seen people from different countries all with the same vision and mission.I have read stories from you all on issues relating to women and girls .Many of us took out time to ensure we work towards being selected .We stretched ourselves and went beyond our limits.
    I have some mind searching questions to ask us;

    1.If you are not selected are u still going to promote the vision for women empowerement?
    2.Will you be ready to bring in this kind of zeal and energy in the course you are championing?
    3.Are you going to be making the positive impact in this forum and outside this platform in terms of sharing and learning from each other?

    I ask these questions because i sat down and told myself that as long as i have decided to tow this path for women emancipation,nothing will stop me...I may or may not be selected.But one thing is very sure,i must continue to fight for girls and women in my community.This is the truth i have told myself .I wish one day we all will look back amd smile because we turned our communites,countries and the world around for good.

    Thanks to this wonderful community of people,i will wish to meet as many as i can one day. There is no height that is small,no effort is too little and no help is underrated.The future we desire starts today.

    Best Wishes,
    Ugomma
    • Keep on keeping on, we can't all be selected, but the work continues, WEE will continue otherwise.

      You will definitely see me here, you will still read from me, and I will be complementary to this vision,

      Happy Rally and Best Wishes
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Sibel Unal
    Hello,
    I have received an email saying that

    The selection committee will review the contributions and will evaluate each applicant. On 10 December 2016, Empower Women will announce the finalists, the 2016-2017 Champions for Change.

    Keep empowering and promote gender equality in your community. Continue to be active change makers online and offline - drive the developments and be always stay connected!


    Does it mean that the rally ended and the assessment started? Very exciting!! It was awesome to me to become a part of this community, even though I'm very busy with my projects at my job, I felt very inspired every evening to log in to EmpowerWomen and read many valuable posts:)

    Best wishes,
    Sibel

    • Juracy Johnson

      Hi Sibel, I did get the same message too! I am also very very excited! Let's keep up the good work we do!   Juracy
    • WE will keep empowering, we will not be silent,  WEE is real and we gotta be real too!

      All the best Sibel 

      Happy Rally and Best wishes
    2 of 2 Replies
  • George Hashaka
    Dear Fellow Prospective Champions,

    I have had challenges getting information from organisations here in Uganda during the research work.Unfortunately,even with organisations with websites don't have all the required information on their websites.How has it been with you?
    • Bosede Akinbolusere
      I have similar challenge with the organization I am showcasing, but I know for sure they have a lot of female in all hierachy of the organization. I am still showcasing them because of their contribution to food and nutrition security in Nigeria and involving female farmers in thier interventions.
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro
      Hello George,
      I have the same problem as you, I have a lot of problems to obtain information about number of employees, and the contact information.
      What I was trying to do is to give the most complete informaton, because even the rganization didn't have all informaiton it work is really important, so I thought it was necessary to up load this institution.

      The best,
      Jessica Muñoz
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
    I have been getting some friends and sharing their stories and works as I post them on my personal blog. This is one of them on letting go as a woman. Enjoy reading it :) 

    https://royalesharon.wordpress.com/2016/12/06/she-let-go/
    • I like your biography Muna,

      Keep on keeping on,
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro

      Hello Munshae 

      I had read some of the stories, thanks for sharing us this! It was really inspiring.

       

      The best,

      Jessica Muñoz

    2 of 2 Replies
  • Paulina Enrriquez Dominguez
    Hi all! 

    I wanted to share an interesting article illustrating a recent trend in companies.   

    "In the midst of ongoing global expansion and a worldwide shortage of critical talent, companies are stepping up efforts – at very different speeds and levels of investment – to recruit and retain a workforce diverse in both demographics and ideas". 

    Article: https://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/human-capital/articles/global-diversity-dividend.html

  • It's exactly 30 minutes before the deadline. It has been really awesome.  Like we have known each other for very long.

    One purpose, one vision, one goal, one heart, one love, one mind, one mission, ONE RESULT!

    CATCH YOU ALL ON THE REBOUND

    WE ARE ALL WINNERS!

    LET'S START WHERE WE ARE

    WITH THE LITTLE THAT WE HAVE

    ONE STEP AT A TIME

    TO HEAL THE WORLD

    WOMEN ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT, HERE WE COME!!!!!
  • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
    https://spark.adobe.com/video/Ny292MaDrw0sz
  • Isabelle de Laperouse
    Hi All-

    Have you heard of the alt- right news site Brietbart? The site posted articles titled, "Why Equality and Diversity Departments Should Only Hire Rich, Straight White Men."  Recently, online ad publisher AppNexus banned the website from using their ad-serving tool, citing violations of its rules against hate speech. With that being said, companies like google are still using the site to track down users and keeping the site afloat. 
    I am not against freedom of speech but I find it disheartening that innovative companies like google are backing sites such as Brietbart.

    If interested in participating in a small act  of resistance today by petitioning Google to ban Brietbart from using its ad serving tools, please follow instructions below. 


    This takes less than 1 minute, but the consequences for Brietbart could be massive if enough people reach out to Google. 
    Here is the info if you want to participate.
    From your laptop or phone, follow these directions and pass it along.
    (1) Go to Breitbart.com (I know, ugh, but keep going).
    (2) Find a Google AdSense ad. It will have a teal triangle and an x in the upper right corner. (I had to try a couple different ads to get to the google page - Amazon ads take you to Amazon, for some reason)
    (3) Click on the triangle. 
    (4) Click "Ad choices"
    (5) On the Google page that loads, Click "learn more" in the text toward the bottom.
    (6) A page loads called About Google Ads.
    Scroll down and click to "Leave feedback on the website you just saw."
    (7) You are given a choice between "the website" and "the ads". Choose "the website".
    (8) Check the box saying that the website (Breitbart) promotes racial intolerance. If you like, add a comment. I did.
    (9) Click submit!
    If Google kicks Breitbart out of its ad network it will make a big difference to the company's bottom line. So tell Google to Dump Breitbart.

     
    • Isabelle de Laperouse
      That is a good point! I also like brainstorming but I do believe this platform allows us to take a stand and take action.  I do agree that we need to  listen to both sides but what happens after brainstorming? 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Ayul Samul
    Hello everyone hope all is well.


    To do require that we step outside the programming of those external infuences and connect with our deeper values, passions, and motivated .but how can we do that? 
  • Betul Yucel
    Hello to all!

    I'm sure, more or less everybody is feeling same. This is really fantastic journey! Although I'am very busy for my business nowadays, I have not lost my motivation to the rally. I learned new organizations, project and ideas during this research as well. Thank you all for your contribution.
    • Isabelle de Laperouse
      It was so eye opening! I look forward and hope to work with all of you! 
    • lweendo hachamba
      hey !
      I totally agree agree. The research has been very enlightening and inspiring. It has also helped me discover which areas of womens empowerment require more activism.
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi all,

      That is true. It has been a learning experience having to reasech all these organizations for the rally. Great to discover so many of them doing an amazing job in my country. It will be great to contact them and learn more details of their work and impact!!

      Good luck for everybody :-)
    • Ekaterina Burtseva
      Yes! It is very facinating to realize how many women and men are there striving for the gender equality and better future. As all the others I feel very inspired. Good luck to everyone on this journey! Gender equality is happening now and it is amazing to know it.
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Same  here,i have learnt a lot in the research and found out a lot has to be done in my country,most of the women association are not functioning or have cease to exsist,especially in the region am researching Ogun State Nigeria.
    5 of 5 Replies
  • Ayul Samul
    HELLO, 


    WHAT'S THE BIG PICTURES FOR WOMAN'S LIFE?

    women's want to grow and develop themselves because they are unsatisfied with their life and direction it is heading.  
    To chenge it's course and create a satisfying. Life,understanding the growth and development process is essential. Our once this process is underway the results are endless. 
    You will find meaning and purposes in yourself that was a bent before. Life goals will become possible. You will use your full potential to benefit yourself and others. New skills and talents will be discovered. Old relationships will be strengthened and new one's will be easily formed all of which will give you a boost in your self-image and self confidence. 
    So dear women's and friends ,champions ;let growth be an unstoppable journey in your life! Keep growing.
  • Nwachukwu Chika Veronica
    Please can some one let me know how I can quickly access the google form for Business development group.The Link from the Webiner is not working for me
    • Oriana Mansur
      https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfO0uyMzXdoBYAx-c9uvwOZatMDqWIlP8KzFEcekDKHNBw7eg/viewform
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Eri I


    Today is International Volunteer's Day !

    Happy Rally to all of us !
  • Hello Prospective Champions. So how many forms did you manage to submit. I know it's not about numbers, but about quality,but just to share how it went.

    We are all winners and this is not the end, but just the beginning of greater things,

    Happy Rally and Best wishes
    • My dear I managed 6,

      Happy Rally and Best Wishes,
    • Sibel Unal
      Hi Olivia,

      Mine is 9. And what about you?

      Best wishes,
      Sibel
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Guedany Figueiras Ayala
    Hi guys!!! 

    I am very nervous because today is the last day to rise the form, December 5.
    Greetings to all.
     
    Remember that we are all champions and that we are agents of change in our community.
    • You are aleady a winner, the work continues, lives will be impacted and change will happen. Keep on keeping on, 

      Happy Rally and Best Wishes 

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Eri I
    Technology is making people feel more alone , soo they are oriented toward Volunteerism.

    According to World Economic Forum:

    Today, on International Volunteer Day, we face a paradox. The Fourth Industrial Revolution has made us more connected and globalized than ever before, yet it is also shaping an age of civic disengagement.

    In his bestseller Bowling Alone, political scientist Robert Putnam identified a sharp rise in Americans’ civic disengagement over the last generation, with empty town hall meetings reflecting “a giant swing toward the individualist pole in our culture, society, and politics.” Although it is twenty years old, it is still starkly relevant today: a new study by two psychologists in a Public Library of Science journal has proposed that “the more someone uses a smartphone for information, the less likely they are to trust neighbours, strangers, and people from other religions or nationalities.”

    Our use of technology is just one factor driving changes in the world of work, but this correlation is bad news for advanced democracies, because strong civic life is a good predictor of the quality of, and trust in, public institutions. Against increasing solitude and disengagement from public life, what are some antidotes to this modern malaise?

    One possible cure is a return to the original social networks supplanted by smartphones - volunteer organizations. These can help members stay ahead of the developments that are already happening with the Fourth Industrial Revolution, as well as the trends explained in this year’s World Economic Forum Future of Jobs report. The report asked the Chief Human Resources Officers of today’s largest employers to identify the core drivers of change in their industries up to 2020.

    • So interesting, it reminds me of this book, " In the age of the smart machine"

      Happy Rally and Best wishes
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Sibel Unal
    Hi All,

    Deadline for completing the form Thursday, 5 December at midnight EST. (it is written on the form, please check)

    Cheers,
    Sibel
    • Nwachukwu Chika Veronica
      Hi Sibel,Kindly let me know how to access the form
    • Sibel Unal
      Hi Adina, I've read the form mistakenly as Monday, thank you for correcting this:) I think it should be today, because UN Women needs some time to asses our forms until 10th of December.
    • Adina Laura Achim
      Hi Sibel,

      I'm confused about this issue as 5th of December is Monday (today) so is the rally for our group ending today or Thursday?
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Dr Rejoice Shumba
    Dear all 

    What is the last day for the submission of the google forms? I am a little bit confused because on the forms it say Thursday 5 December but the 5th of December is NOT Thursday but Monday (today). 

    Please help urgently 
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro
      Heloo Rejoice,
      I think that today is the last day to submit your google forms.
      The best,
      Jessica Muñoz
    • Adina Laura Achim
      I'm confused with this matter as well, is it today or Thursday?
    • Jodney Paul Alcime
      Would you like to share the link? Please
    • Roxana Damas
      my understanding is that it is due today
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Roxana Damas
    Thank you all for sharing your thoughts and knowledge! It has been a wonderful experience thus far, to see how much beautiful work and motivated leaders are partnering for change at the global scale. In fact, I want to share with you one area of business an empowerment that has always troubled be and that is the Entertainment Industry. Women have long been part of this industry and yet we have much work to do for women to be the true entrepreneurs and leaders in this industry. Furthermore, we need more women leading the change in pop culture, media, and entertainment to bring a more empowered presence of women not only as objects but as creator, influencer, and entrepreneurs. 
    There are more and more women who are making change in this industry, but I continue concerned that those who do not reach the higher names and income for their entertainment careers, do not have the same level of empowerment. Technology has furthermore changed the industry and now is a good time see positive growth. My team and I are starting a campaign to promote business economic empowerment for women artist, musicians, actress, models, etc... (this message is particularly geared to the level of abuse of promotion of young Latina women at the local levels) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154795239793415&set=a.10150180126163415.326747.669338414&type=3&theater&notif_t=like&notif_id=1480909406526204 
    If you have stories of success and empowerment in your country in this topic. Please share.
  • Renu Tandon
    Fantastic article @Harvard

      How CEOs Can Put Gender Balance on the Agenda at Their Companies

    https://hbr.org/2016/11/how-ceos-can-put-gender-balance-on-the-agenda-at-their-companies?utm_campaign=harvardbiz&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social 

  • Medinat Lawal
    Hello? I couldnt access the link to the google form. I wonder if anyone is having the same issue? Anyone? Please reply. Thank you.
    • Grace Pisirai
      Thank you @ Daniel for assistinng. @Medinat, hope it is working now
    • Daniel Kerber
      Hey Medinat, here it is- this is working for me: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfO0uyMzXdoBYAx-c9uvwOZatMDqWIlP8KzFEcekDKHNBw7eg/viewform?c=0&w=1
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Tinuola Aina
    Girl - Child marriage has been a very topical issue in developing countries. Last week, 16 African Union member countries took the bold step in signing an agreement to work towards abolishing girl-child marriage by 2030. 

    Though a lot of obstacles will be encountered from socio cultural to religious beliefs, but with a collective effort of agencies, NGOs and the government, this can be achieved. 
    • Nwanneka Okolo
      Girl-child marriage is a scourge that needs to be tackled on all fronts. Kudos to the African Union for this proactive stance. Laws/Conventions/rules and educating women at the grassroots are not mutually exclusive. All hands must be on deck to fight this problem.
    • I agree with Medinat because even if there are agreements at the governmental level and policies/laws in place in each country, the question is whether they will be enforced at all levels. Very often local law enforcement fail to even enforce or prosecute perpetrators as they themselves do not see it as wrong or simply ignore the situation until the international community sheds light on the situation. 

      While these policies are an initial first step, we need to focus on educating girls and women. I believe with education, young girls and women will know that there have so many opportunities available to them, and they should decide on their future. Furthermore, with education women and young girls can learn about the impact of physical, mental and emotional impact of child marriages.
    • Michal Strahilevitz Ben Eliezer
      Just another thought and that's around the role of education as means of ending girl-cihld marriage, and whether we are not putting too much emphasis on education vs. real legal and enforcement procedures.  Education and changing cultural norms and practices can take years... sometimes inforcement can have a much quicker impact and contribute to changing of behavioural patterns. 

      A few years back, I participated in some conference which discussed the impacts of drage abuse and alchohol consumption on drivers. For years to prevent this practice, there were many initiatives being used to educate youth in schools before they take to the wheel. However, the change in level of drink and drive practice was lower than they actually wanted to share. On the other hand in countries that boosted up the penalties in which those who are found guilty could face, saw a very quick reduction in people taking the wheel under the influence of alcohol/ drug . Similarly , I am wondering if countries do more to have stronger pentalities with imprissonment sentences for those that are found guilty, while strengthning their enforcement mechanisms (ie. having also police and legal systems that are not corrupt) and judges that can take swift action, couldn't have a much bigger impact to that of eduction in the immediate term. 

      The reason I highlight this is that I persionally don't think there is time to loose - these girls face terrible consequances for being sent off to married , We have the responsibility to protect them! 

      Best
      Michal 
    • Medinat Lawal
      Ofcourse Ms.Tinuola, Abolition of girl child marriage is achievable but its going to require a hell of effort from all parties concerned about the abolition. I believe the most Important tool needed is taking education, awareness and empowerment to the women in the grassroots especially. I had an encounter with some women in a village in Kebbi state,NIgeria. You'd be amazed at the level of ignorance of these women...they do not even see it as a wrongful act. I hope with the signing of this agreement, a much more bolder steps will be taken towards the Abolition of girl child marriage.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • aderemi bamgboye
    I came across these 30 powerful lovely quotes by women and for women , thought i share , hope you enjoy. 

    "If you want something said, ask a man; if you want something done, ask a woman." —Margaret Thatcher

    "A strong woman understands that the gifts such as logic, decisiveness, and strength are just as feminine as intuition and emotional connection. She values and uses all of her gifts." —Nancy Rathburn

    "A woman is like a tea bag—you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water." —Eleanor Roosevelt

     

    "I always wanted to be a femme fatale. Even when I was a young girl, I never really wanted to be a girl. I wanted to be a woman." —Diane von Furstenberg

    "I'm tough, I'm ambitious, and I know exactly what I want. If that makes me a bitch, okay." ―Madonna

    "A feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men." ―Gloria Steinem

    "I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life's a bitch. You've got to go out and kick ass." —Maya Angelou

    "I raise up my voice—not so I can shout, but so that those without a voice can be heard...we cannot succeed when half of us are held back." ―Malala Yousafzai

    "Feminism isn't about making women strong. Women are already strong. It's about changing the way the world perceives that strength." —G.D. Anderson

    "Women are always saying, 'We can do anything that men can do.' But Men should be saying, 'We can do anything that women can do.'" —Gloria Steinem

    "You don't have to be pretty. You don't owe prettiness to anyone. Not to your boyfriend/spouse/partner, not to your co-workers, especially not to random men on the street. You don't owe it to your mother, you don't owe it to your children, you don't owe it to civilization in general. Prettiness is not a rent you pay for occupying a space marked 'female.'" —Erin McKean

    "A woman with a voice is, by definition, a strong woman." —Melinda Gates

    "Women, like men, should try to do the impossible, and when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others." —Amerlia Earhart

    "When a man gives his opinion, he's a man. When a woman gives her opinion, she's a bitch."―Bette Davis

    "I hope the fathers and mothers of little girls will look at them and say, 'Yes, women can.'" —Dilma Rousseff

    "Women are leaders everywhere you look—from the CEO who runs a Fortune 500 company to the housewife who raises her children and heads her household. Our country was built by strong women, and we will continue to break down walls and defy stereotypes." —Nancy Pelosi

    "Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in."―Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    "I do not feel any less of a woman. I feel empowered that I made a strong choice that in no way diminishes my femininity." —Angelina Jolie on her double mastectomy

    "The question isn't who's going to let me; it's who's going to stop me." —Ayn Rand

    "We need women at all levels, including the top, to change the dynamic, reshape the conversation, to make sure women's voices are heard and heeded, not overlooked and ignored." —Sheryl Sandberg

    "It took me quite a long time to develop a voice, and now that I have it, I am not going to be silent." —Madeleine Albright

    "Women are the real architects of society."—Harriet Beecher Stowe

    "I've never met a woman who is not strong, but sometimes they don't let it out. Then there's a tragedy, and then all of a sudden that strength comes. My message is let the strength come out before the tragedy." ―Diane von Furstenberg

    "Women have always been the strong ones of the world. The men are always seeking from women a little pillow to put their heads down on. They are always longing for the mother who held them as infants." —Coco Chanel

    "Feminism is for everybody" ―bell hooks

    "I believe that the rights of women and girls is the unfinished business of the 21st century." —Hillary Clinton

    "We need to reshape our own perception of how we view ourselves. We have to step up as women and take the lead."—Beyoncé

    "I am a Woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal Woman, that's me." ―Maya Angelou

    "Why has the word [feminism] become such an uncomfortable one? It is not the word that is important; it's the idea and the ambition behind it." —Emma Watson

    "The idea of being a feminist: so many women have come to this idea of it being anti-male and not able to connect with the opposite sex, but what feminism is about is equality and human rights. For me that is just an essential part of my identity."—Lena Dunham

     
     
     
     
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      Thank you for sharing.
    • Dr Rejoice Shumba
      Thanks for sharing these qoutations. Some of them are quiet motivating 
    • Grace Pisirai
      i like :). i also like "The history of all times, and of today especiallyteaches that... women will be forgotten if they forget to think about themselves." - Louise Otto, (Luise Otto-Peters) "
    3 of 3 Replies
  • aderemi bamgboye
    According to Desmond Tutu "if we are going to see real development in the world then our best investment is women" 
    • Erastus Cheruiyot
      I strongly agree. Women need be accorded the opportunities to contribute. There's need to accord them the space and equip them with requisite empowerment. They are a resource that can't be ignored.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
    When it comes to female political leadership in Africa,Rwanda is on top with 63.8% female represantation in parliament.

    How is this possible? If we have anyone from Rwanda in this group I would love to learn from you,or anyone who can help?

    In Botswana we have only 9.5%
  • anupriya prakash
    Hi, 

    Can anyone tell me,if we can include small and medium enterprises in the research?
    Thanks in advance. 
    • Jacqueline Salguero Huaman
      Hi what I remembered from the webinar is that you should include any company with more than 10 employees.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Khadijah Ahmad
    Hello All!

    Hope your research is doing well. Can someone please tell me the deadline for the rally. As on the form it says Thursday 5th December. Whereas, 5th is on monday. Can someone please clarify. Thank you
    • Leah Davidson
      It was confirmed on Facebook just now that the deadline is 11:59 PM EST on Monday, December 5.
    • Khadijah Ahmad
      Thank you so much everyone.
      The time is midnight according to Eatern Standard times (EST)
    • Jacqueline Salguero Huaman
      Then my next question will be Monday 5th at what timezone.
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      Its 5th December that you should work with. I believe the thursday was an error.
    • Grace Pisirai
      Hi guys


      I have just the same question. @Deepa will take the advice.
    • Deepa Pillai
      I've asked the same. I think you should take it as 5th, Monday to be safe. That's what many of us are doing.
    6 of 6 Replies
  • Fernanda Moura

    Hello everyone, hope everybody is doing great at researching!!

    We would like to share a project we are doing and welcome any suggestiong.

    There are millions of women around the world leading great endeavors. However, even women being half of the world population, we are mostly bombarded with great stories of men - entrepreneurs, inventors, CEOs etc Taciana and I are doing a project that aims to shed a light in many women worldwide who are being trailblazers and building companies in various areas and going above and beyond to build their stories and leave their mark. (https://www.empowerwomen.org/en/community/stories/2016/08/funders-project-inspiring-women-to-leave-their-mark)

     

    Our idea came from our observation while living in the US, close to Silicon Valley, that even there we would mostly see men in entrepreneurship-related events. Through researching we found out that among the main reasons women do not start business is the lack of female role models. We started our journey last July and we already interviewed in the USA, Mexico, Canada, Japan, South Korea, China, Singapore and there will be many more during the next 12 months.

    You can check some messages from women entrepreneurs we interviewed at our facebook/thegirlsontheroad and we would appreciated suggestions or comments!! 


    • Dening Lohez
      Dear Fernanda,

      congratulations to this great interview series which resonates with all future women entreprenuers.

      What about a monthly  speed dating to match sucessful women entreprenuers to inspirating women MBA students, SEMT students in happy hour with sip of wine.  The aspirant will be able to find a mentor, a role model in participating in
      this speed dating practice. 
    • Betul Yucel
      Hello Fernanda, you are doing a great job! If you help in Turkey, let me know.
    • Nwanneka Okolo
      Hello Fernanda, I sincerely laud your initiative. I hope your journeys will bring you to Africa and precisely Nigeria. We are a very hospitable people despite the occasional bad press.

      i will be following your progress. Keep it up.
    • Peggy Tse
      Great work @Fernanda Moura! I am also actively engaging in the female entrepreneurship circle here in Hong Kong, China. If there is anything I can help with or contribute, please let me know. Would definitely continue to follow where you guys are going next!
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Wow, this is amazing keep the good work up.
    5 of 5 Replies
  • Ana Chkheidze
    Hi guys, hope your research is going on well,

    I have some questions if you could help: 

    1) Since we should not use Empower Women's name at this point, how do you obtain information such as number of employees? what is your back story for requiring such information. Since it is not something that should be stated on their website or somewhere else. Also, how do you select a contact person?
    2) Can NGOs be included? 

    Thank you in advance
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi Ana, 

      Some of the institutions I researched I was able to google the number of employees but as you mentioned, it is rare to find it, let alone number of female employees. What I am doing is complete as much as possible and If this number is not there, I just let as "not available" since in the next phase this info will be easily accessible by contacting them. I am using my time to research and find interesting organizations, mentioning why I judge it is important.

      For the contact person, I am getting names and emails from their PR agencies that is easily found in their websites so it will be a start. Some of them mentioned people/email from communication/marketing but if not, PR.

      And yes, we can include NGO as well.

      Hope my comments helped! 

    1 of 1 Replies
  • aderemi bamgboye
    This is a must read for everywoman, inspiring!!!
    http://upliftconnect.com/why-women-need-a-tribe/
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Nwanneka Okolo
     
     
    Where I come from cultural norms and stereotypes are so embedded that at times, one feels like physically pulling the women out of their lethargy. Women help to perpetuate the injustice meted out to them. Right from birth the boy child is treated as king and he grows up with that. From a young age, his female siblings defer to him because he is the treasure that will carry on the family name. Some mothers will not allow their sons to go near the kitchen. The girl child is enslaved by her own mother. She does almost all the house chores. In her old age the girl child, now grown, takes care of her father and her mother until they pass on. However, when the father makes his will, he devolves the landed properties to the male child or children. The females get little or nothing. The tragedy is that the WOMAN ALSO DISINHERITS her female children by giving her own landed properties to her male children. That is part of the reason why only 10% of the land is owned by women in my environment where the most desirable collateral for lending is landed property. The woman is already at a disadvantage. 
     
    As our menfolk keep telling us, the woman is her own greatest enemy. The obnoxious widowhood practices where women shave their hair and where black or white clothing when their husbands die still persists till today. It is appalling when women who go around with us spouting women empowerment and all that still bow to the same unwholesome practices when they lose their own husbands. Happily, there are still quite a few who stand their ground and would not be intimidated. 
     
    Trying to persuade her to share her property equally between all her children will mostly not yield fruit. 
     
    The sad thing is that this enslavement (mourning period) is brought about by the women themselves. Just recently, our advocacy is gaining ground and individual towns (in the South East) are cutting down the mourning period from 12 months to 6 months, 3 months, as the case may be.
     
    So while we are mobilizing and sensitizing our youths to embrace skills acquisition and honest labor, reasoning with the young men to treat women with respect just as they would like other males to  treat their own mother and sisters, we are also grappling with our women (at the popular annual August Meetings, women associations and women religious group meetings) to do away with some self denigrating practices. It is a big struggle and one that will not be won in a hurry.  
     
    Please I will welcome more ideas and suggestions on how to emancipate our women and free them from their own bondage.
     
    The struggle continues.
     
    • Ugomma Ogu
      I am very much aware of what you talked about because that is  where i come from.Truly the first thing we need to do is step into their AUGUST-MEETING,becasue i see it as one of the largest gathering of community women  yearly both educated and not.We need to draw up a long term plan that will discourage all these vices and promote freedom for women.For example organise a smaller cell group programs for women in different communities,start a state wide campaign that will promote our vision,go ahead to involve the communit leaders and religious bodies to gain their support.This is becauase these set of people have a strong influence on the activites of the women. Remember the men are not left out,because they too have a role to play in ensuring equality among his children.So we will will involve them through what i call WO-MEN  COLLABORATION.

      We can work together with the villagers to track the success of our programs and report cases where there is a bridge.We can then bring in larger international organisations that will support  our emancipation. Remember this wont be easy because many will kick against it,but i tell you many are looking for a solution and will also be ready to embrace it.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Nwanneka, I think thats what we face most of us especially in Africa.

      Yes to some extent us women we are our own enemy but I believe that our greatest enemy is the issues of cultural violence and structural violence. 

      This women grew up being taught by their parents that this is how they should behave culturaly and otherwise,so what they know to do best is to hold on to whatthey were taught and as the elders of today they safe guard the very culture which might disadvantage them because to them this is how things should be done.

      I have found that dealing with issues of cultural change, we need to start conversations with the very gatekeepers of such practices and in this case women. It is a change which takes some time to come to fruitution but bit by bit we will see some changes.
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu

      Hi Nwanneka,

      This is very true as we are from the same south-east region. This happens mostly with people that dwell in the rural area. Education and enlightenment plays a key role in changing their mindset. Many fathers in the cities now will their properties to their female children and when married, ensures that they are well settled by giving them their own share of inheritance to start their family. Many of them have come to embrace the female child as one who can be more successful than the male child. Everything still dwells with changing the mindset of parents towards their female children. Once the mindsets of parents and the society can change towards their female daughters, most of those unhealthy practices towards widows will be put to an end.

    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi Nwanneka,

      Thanks for sharing a bit about your culture. 

      It is sad to see how we, women, in many cases are the contributor to our own challenges. I agree with you that we have, since an early age, to educate and sensibilize children, boys and girls, that we should be treated and treated everybody around us with respect and give equal opportunity.

      Taciana and I are doing a project related to women entrepreneurship in which we are interviewing women entrepreneurs in different countries. In many cases we heard that it was their own families the ones who did not support them or gave a different treatement related to their sons and daughters. 

      Even in developed countries such as South Korea, one of the entrepreneurs we interviewed told us her mon prays for her business to fail and so she can solely dedicate to find a husband and build a family of her own. When she was a teenager, she wanted to study abroad to learn english and her mom, although offering to her brother, told her she would not invest any more money on her because she would quit business once married.

      Women have to be more unite and help each other and work to the advancement of all women, that is why we should keep giving our contribution so future generations will eventualy live in a balance society.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Sibel Unal
    Hi All, how is your research going? Do you arrange private meetings with companies or perform your search on the internet? How much detail we need to provide?
    Cheers,
    Sibel
    • Leah Davidson
      Sometimes news articles or media mentions of the organization can also be helpful in finding information. I sometimes also research women staff on LinkedIn. Hope your research is going well!
    • Sibel Unal
      Hi again, thank you for your replies:) i do my research mainly on the internet, some info is hard to fill such as no of women employees and contact email address. i try to do my best.
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi Sibel, doing good, what about you?

      Meral, during the webnar, told us to not aproach companies/organizations at this stage since we will do that in the next phase. For now, we should focus on internet research to find good institutions and contacts. 

      Most of the items we should complete is a short answer and I am mostly giving more detail for why such an organization was chosen and how I know it.

      Hope this comments helped!
    • Dhara Patel
      Hi Sibel,

      Yes, I have arranged meeting with the HR department. by the way,  Hows your research going on?  It's really interesting to know the meaning of gender equality for organizations.  
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Tim Immaculate Bih

    My Name is Tim Immaculate Bih. I was born and raised in a community where technical education was considered a man's thing. It was very strange for a girl to do building construction. My first week in college, I was inspired by a girl who was doing building construction and my anxiety pushed me to do it as well. She was my role model.

    Unfortunately for me, my role model diverted from this male-dominated field to a female-dominated field. Some girls who ventured into it did not end up in it as well due to lack of encouragement and mentorship. My enthusiasm and charisma in this field kept me going. I had a vision and that vision was to become a civil engineer.

    Climbing the success ladder in this field was a tough one for me. I was being mocked by both some of my family members and community members for what I was doing but the spirit was not quenched. As young as I was in form five, I became a role model unknowingly - my name was being used in campaign during schools re-opening to attract student to the college, but some people did not still see a bright future in the field for girls.

    Graduating from the university as a civil engineer, I became an entrepreneur in the construction industry where I founded ICON Co. Ltd. Being the first female entrepreneur in the North West Region of Cameroon, I decided to carry out most of the construction projects in my community in other to encourage more girls and reach infrastructure challenges to improve development.

    Today, my work in the community is encouraging more parents to send their children to technical schools. To ensure that these girls do not get discouraged when pursuing studies in this field, I created a social impact department in my enterprise through which girls in engineering are being mentored, empowered, and primary school children are being sensitized on the importance of technical education especially for the girl child.

    #UNWomen #empowerwomen #VVGrow #Techwomen #WomenInStem

    • Dhara Patel
       You have been example for rest of girls who want to remove hurdles settled by society.  I wish more and more girls follow your steps and remove the label of "Male dominated" industry.
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      You are definitely an inspiration to other women. Keep it up.
    • Fernanda Moura
      HI Tim,

      That is an amazing story, we definitely need more role models like you to inspire and empower other women.

      Loved that you shared your story. Taciana and I are doing a project called Founders Project where we are going to many countries interviewing women entrepreneurs to tell their story through a documentary.  

      Our idea and inspiration came from not seeing so many women in business as men. We went on to research reports and found out that one of the reasons women don't engage in entrepreneurship is the lack of female role models. They don't see women doing it. They don't know other entrepreneurs and so they believe this path is for men. 

      Great to hear that role model was important in your life and that today you are an inspiration to other girls!! Congrats!!

      We definitely need more women like you :-) 
    3 of 3 Replies
  • hello everyone! what do business start-up, development and economic empowerment mean for rural and urban women? if anyone interested in this topic, please share how this is shaping rural and urban women's lives in your country or region?
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi Sabrina,

      I believe development and economic emporwerment is important for women in general. Rural or urban, when we empower women economicaly the whole society/communitity benefit. There are quite a few studies showing that women give a lot more back to their enviroment, compared as men, when they have their own business. 

      There is a very interesting report about women in different parts of the world, worth reading if you haven't yet, called GEM 2014 WOMEN'S REPORT. http://gemconsortium.org/report

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Deepa Pillai
    Hello
    the deadline on the form says Thursday, 5 th dec but 5th is this Monday.  Was there any clarification on this? I'm assuming it's an error and they mean Monday, 5th Dec. 
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi Deepa, during the webinar they mentioned December 5th, so I am keeping this date as the deadline. :-)
    • Juracy Johnson
      I am considering Monday also Have a great weekend everyone! Juracy
    • Tim Immaculate Bih
      Hi Deepa, I am considering monday 5th as well.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Ayul Samul
    The team agribusiness is often confused with agriculture the same way some people in many parts of the world still confuse south sudan and sudan this is understandable, because as with many such concepts -thing's often can and up in philosophical arguments like which -come -first -chicken or-egg dilemma .
    For the sake of simplicity, let us agree that agriculture refers to the way people either access food or ensure it availability, not only during periods of harvest or plenty but also throughout the year another fashionable world these day is 'food  security  .people have different ways to meeting their food need. 
    • Ayul good observation. I would like to think of Agriculture and Agribusiness as very complementary to the extent that one cannot clearly put a line as to where one sector ends and the other one begins.

      Happy Rally Ayul 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Isabelle de Laperouse
    Has anyone heard about GEF "Gender Equality Fund." It is a project started by Angelica Fuentes Foundation. GEF allows people to invest in a fund consisting of bundled up publicly US companies "who have better or improving practices on gender equality and women's economic empowerment." 
    I never heard about this! Sounds like a good idea in the US. Here is the full article.

    My question to everyone is does your home country have similar funds? Have they been helpful? 
    • Fernanda Moura
      HI Isabelle,

      This is great! I am from Brazil and never heard about such thing there. I believe this is probably a new trend, a good one, as in the past there were funds created to invest in environmentaly responsible companies, or clean tech companies and so on. 

      In Brazil, people are more and more aware of investing not only for the money but also in companies who are more social and environmentaly responsible.

      Taciana and I are doing a project on women entrepreneurship, you can check us on Facebook as "thegirlsontheroad" and we have been encountering many organizations and one that got our attnetion was SheEo in Canada- http://www.sheeo.ca/ - They have a fund formed by women to invest in women entrepreneurs. It is not exactly what your article is about but is also a great way to foster women's economic empowerment.

      We need more organizations that are willing to provide opportunities for women advancement!!
    • Juracy Johnson
      Not in Mexico. Great news that the fund exists in the USA
    • Dhara Patel
      Thank you for sharing it. Good  to know about it.  well, There isn't any Gender Equality fund in our country.

      You would like to know that There's "Ministry for women and child development" in my country which is working for the analysing the current policy for women empowerment and make an amendment in it.
    • Isabelle thanks for this discussion. I failed to access the link, but this sounds like a very gender sensitive idea.

      Happy Rally Isabelle!
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Ayul Samul
    In south Sudanese the grassroots dont have skills and knowledge so how can we easily  Encouraging them to be innovative and come up with business idea that can help them and their families in teams of food and medication? 
    • Ayul, it might help if community based planning and participatory methodologies are used to determine what it is that communities know best and what indigenous knowledge, they have and then support them to start from where they are, with the little that they have and any external training and support will bring sustainable results
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Joel Odota
    In Uganda, we have got the Village Savings and Loan Association (VLSA) for both men and women. I am not sure if it is in other countries too. This is usually a group of about 10-30 members who save, borrow their money every week. The interest, fines and other benefits earned are shares equally according to the amount of saving of every member. This initiative today is spearheaded by mainly nongovernmental agencies mainly to improve the saving culture of the people in rural communities. Research shows that the men aren't good at saving compared to the women. Women are smart! 
    #EmpowerWomenRally
    #BreakingTheGlass
    • Yes, women are indeed smart but in some societies women often do not have control over their own savings. how is it in the context of Uganda?
    • Tim Immaculate Bih
      Hi Joel, in my country we have what is called "Njangi groups". This is similar to what you have but they are only registered at the local level. There are some for men and women. These groups are realy helping women/men economically
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Jodney Paul Alcime
    “One of the biggest growth markets in the world may surprise you. You’ve heard about the opportunities opening up in countries like China, regions like Asia and industries like green technology. But one major emerging market hasn’t received the attention it deserves: women.” Hillary Clinton

    It is becoming increasingly clear that women are, and will continue to be, powerful drivers of development. When men and women become more equal, economies grow faster, fewer people remain in poverty, and overall well-being increases. 

    Yet the impact of women's economic empowerment goes beyond this. Research has shown that women are more likely than men to invest a large proportion of their household income in the education and well-being of their children. When women are empowered to make an income, accumulate assets and increase their economic security, they improve industrial capacity and spur economic growth by creating new jobs, as well as expanding the pool of human resources and talents available in a country.

    Both women and men face challenges in setting up their own businesses, but for women, the barriers are often greater and harder to overcome. They are often confronted with a lack of government support in terms of policy, laws, and services, and in some countries have only limited access to formal bank accounts, which prevents them from accessing loans or credit.

    By increasing opportunities for women to make life choices that go beyond gender-limiting cultural norms, as often seen in education, we can help to create an environment in which female entrepreneurs can thrive, therefore promoting gender equality. 
    • Removing barriers to women's economic empowerment is important. However aside from those macro institutional barriers, there are also barriers at household level often mediated by socio-cultural norms. Do you think only increasing opportunities would help?
    • "The most effective tool for development is women empowerment"....I agree Jodney, we have to utilise this tool effectively
    2 of 2 Replies
  • George Hashaka
    Countries such as Brazil have cash transfer programmes for poor women on condition that they send their children to school.With such programmes a family is able to have decent meals and improved general welfare for family members as well as children of the family accessing education.Ofcourse with the children having access to eduction and later graduating enhances the economic and general wellbeing of the family.I also attended a conference here in Uganda,where experts on development were advocating for cash transfer programme as a means of empowering the indigent.
    Do you have such programmes in your country,and do you think it can be a solution to combating poverty in third world countries?
    • Fernanda Moura
      Hi George, 

      Interesting post. As a Brazilian I would say that, unfortunately, although in paper sounds an amazing program and indeed have benefited millions of people, it does not help in the long term to end poverty.

      In Brazil, this kind of program has created a dependency of many families and because they know they will have a guarantee money, they many times will not look for jobs because if they get paid a certain amount of money they lose the benefit. So, instead of being a remedy for a short period, some families decides is better not work at all and this is bad for them, for the community and for the country to prosper. 

      As the old story, we should teach people how to fish and not only providing them with guaranteed fish for the rest of their lives. Empowerment, in my opinion, means to created opportunites, educate the women so they can progress by their own means, not depending only on government programs.
    • Shweta Bhatia
      India has some conditional cash transfer programs (CCTs) - one in particular is working in one state of India to incentivize families to allow their daughters to remain unmarried until they are 18. Only once the daughter has turned 18 and they have proven that she is unmarried, will the families receive the money. This was meant to enable women in this particular state to avoid child marriages, to pursue education for longer and to reap the benefits from a more complete education. However, studies looking at the efficacy of this program found that, while families being paid were delaying marriage until their daughters were 18, overall CCTs alone were not able to transform social norms and social beliefs about gender roles. They did find that CCTs have a benefit on a girl's education, but they suggested supplemented interventions with CCTs so as to create dialogue about perceived gender roles and reflect on beliefs so as to hopefully move the views into a more progressive light.
    • George, thanks for this topic. Cash transfer programmes indeed empower women to meet daily needs. I have worked with women beneficiaries in conditional and non-conditional transfer programmes. We found that when there was no conditionality, cash could be abused, either by male counterparts or women themselves. In other words, cash usage did not meet expected uses. However, when there was conditionality, for example, cash being used for specific household needs or income generation opportunities, there were high levels of accountability.

      In essence, cash transfer programmes support humanitarian activities efficiency. It's easy to carry cash around, widely accepted as a legal tender and gives households dignity, they can decide the best way to use the cah, especially if well conscentised.

      Happy Rally George
    • Nwanneka Okolo
      Of course such Programmes help to combat poverty in the long run because the target group gets educated and education they say, is an escape. We have variants of the cash transfer  programme majorly in the northern part of my country. In the south however, free food is introduced in schools to ensure that the child gets at least one good meal a day and this encourages indigent parents/guardians to send their children and wards to school.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Joel Odota
     have come to realize that it is really true business is the only way to go to success today. People have read books and studied to the peak and yet without business and entrepreneurship they won't go a way farther than the businessmen and women of the world. It is also very true that women do perfect business but they only need empowerment. As a man, I have personally been engaged in several business activities but the saving culture of men is just very poor whilst a woman keeps every penny she gets from the business and never spend it recklessly 
    empower your daughter or wife today or any girl around you; could be your sister or classmate. Encourage them to press even harder and you will definitely see the outcome of their contribution. 
    #ConceptsOfWEE
    • Women entrepreneurs need total support. There is so much potential. Thanks for raising this!

      Happy Rally Joel
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Way to go!!! Its true women are good bankers,they will so manage your resources that you will become better financially. I am an advocate for women empowement,every woman needs empowerment.
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      Thank you very much for this. Let's hope men will learn to empower their wives and daughters financially.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Neatness Muze Msemo
    As a founder of Africa Upendo Group,it helped to go from city to rural area.Before we tried to empower graduate to think big buy changing their mind not to think about empoyment  from the government only but to become also an entrepreneurs.

    To be honest our Govt education system here in Tanzania,does not prepare student to become an entrepreneur.So we encouraged them to start to think and not to blame our Govt.We tried to conduct seminars,workshops in various scholls,universities and now most of them are now getting momentum we hope.
    Now we moved to rural area to protect our environment,to train youth and women.This is a good and a best idea to do because in Tanzania most of the people live in rural area.
    our main focus is to make sure that women can make a big move.We collaborate with local bank.By establishing groups we cal them VICOBA wich allow 30 women and men to be together in a group.Those members are entrepreneurs.They sell and buy goods/products and every two weeks they meet to deposit/withdraw money by supervised by one of the supervisor from the bank.Throuth these meeting we train them like how to Set savings,by starting it  immediately to save.Even other health topic and social media as well.
    • Nice Neatness.

      Awareness raising and follow up action are keys to women empowerment. Reaching out to rural areas ensures that none is left behind. We need to break the rural-urban divide if we are serious abut women empowerment. That's where the majority are located....

      Happy Rally Neatness!
    • George Hashaka
      That is a great initiative,however,I am of the opinion that women shouldn't not only be trained on developing a culture of saving but this should be a topic in a broad entrepreneurship development programme. Let me know if you are interested in accessing such a training programme. 
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Tendai Chidzero
    I would like to share with you how village savings programs are helping malawians in rural areas  to start up businesses and also contribute to their social life in this time of economic hustle where banks are not willing to support small businesses, and i would be glad to know if these groups also exist in your respective countries.

    The village savings and loans group –community bank – exists to empower people financially to take charge of their lives. Members are able to buy shares priced at 100 malawian kwacha (mk) less than a dollar and borrow money which has to be repaid at 20% interest. After 6 months, the money is distributed amongst the members in proportion to the amount of shares bought. Those who have invested more, receive a larger return. Records are kept in each member’s share books.

    Some members lament establishing shops/businesses which stocks nuts, oil etc.

    The groups also have a social fund – all members are to contribute 20 Malawian kwacha (less than a dollar) which is used for members or their relatives who have fallen ill.

    • Tendai thanks. You know community based and driven financial schemes will always be sustainable. When linked with formal financial institutions there is definitely fireworks. There is community organisation which can translate to commodity associations and increase rural households negotiation,  lobbying, advocacy, etc

      Happy Rally Tendai 
    • aderemi bamgboye
      These are some of the ways small businesses are encouraged, small businesses are not encouraged finacially by most banks because they are considered high risk.
    • George Hashaka
      Even here in Uganda we have such saving and loans schemes,and Uganda Investment Authority(UIA) of the Government of Uganda used to conduct entrepreneurship development courses in conjuction with some non governmental organisations. This approach to empower women with savings and loan schemes supported with entrepreneurship development courses can indeed empower women and improve household incomes. Nevertheless,the gap is wide and much effort and resources are needed to reach all women in the countryside. 

      So even in your country Malawi,all women must have access to these savings scheme but also supported with entrepreneurship development courses.
    • Munashe Sharon Nyatanga
      This sounds extremely empowering and seems to be developing the women ofcourse .could you share more on how this movement was put into place because it would be helpful especially in third world countries
    • Dr Rejoice Shumba
      Thanks Tendai for sharing. Do you have an internet link to a document which explains more about these village savings?
    • Catherine Ruge
      Hi Tendai, good to hear that your doing it in Malawi, we have the same thing in Tanzania it is called VICOBA, (village Community Bank) , the prigram has helped rular women so much and mo of them have been empowered economically by being able to establish small businesses
    • Dhara Patel
      very positive story and inspirational. Thank you for sharing it. 
    7 of 7 Replies
  • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
    I have had intresting discoveries since the commencement of my research there is a lot to be done in my country in the asspect of help groups
  • Juracy Johnson

    The only business that we can tell you that preferably hires women here in Mexico are the "textile factories" . Low salary and lots of hours of work. Sincerely,
    Juracy
    • Thelma Iniomor
      Scholarship programs that help women go to school to study professional courses should be introduced. Women should be given start up finances to venture into various businesses. Skill development and training should be done to help them acquire necessary skills to move into other areas
    • Thelma Iniomor
      wow, Women need to be empowered and encourage to explore other markets.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      We need a strong movement to change this.

      What do you think could be the best thing to do in that scenario?
    • Eri I
      Even in our country too, is the same thing, mostly women are employed in textile or shoes manufacture industries.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Bahar Aldanmaz
    One more, very inclusive article I've found during my research that I think will be helpful for all of us from several different countries.

    Enjoy!


    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1990/12/20/more-than-100-million-women-are-missing/




    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      Thanks for the link posted.
    • George Hashaka
      Hi Bahar, 

      Thanks for the article.Will find out how it can enrich the entire world body of women. It is indeed very imperative for us to continue sharing such information and knowledge. This platform creates an opportunity to advance both social capital and intellectual capital.Best!
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Guedany Figueiras Ayala
    Hi guys how are you? how is the research activity?


    As the same like others,  I discovered self help women groups in my community Puebla,  Mexico  and all hardworker women in the organisations are really impacting the lives of many women, but they dont  have websites because they dont have budget for that. So really sad.

    But they are working a lot, so i hope very soon, all that women can create ther websites.  
    Have a good day guys and smiling always. We are Champions :) 
    • Grace Pisirai
      i agree, i have found also that some rural coropratives same as mentioned by @Tendai Chidzero  above, doing very significant work but lacking digital media presence as websites or social media account. I have also learnt that apart from not having budget, some are not aware of the existance of such technology or actualy have no access to such technology.

       
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro
      Hello Guedany, I felt so identified with you and Juracy.
      I'm from Zacatecas, Mexico and I start a big research about women empowerment in my city, and yes, I have found some  groups that support women empowerment, but they normally act in a really poor communities so they do't have website, the only propaganda that they use is the word of mouth, it is so sad because there exist a lot of woman that want to make a change but it results harder for them because they didn't have enough resources.

      Best,

      Jessica Muñoz
    • Juracy Johnson
      I know Guedany. I have the same problem.
      I searched trying to find Institutions/Business, etc that empower women or that they employ mostly women and I couldn't find any either for our Mexican Republic. Only the same as you, support groups. Saludos desde Ensenada! Juiracy
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Leah Davidson
    Hi, hope everyone is having a good day! Does anyone know how much detail we are supposed to provide for the filled in form?
    • Michal Strahilevitz Ben Eliezer
      Hi Leah, 
      I raised that question during the webminar. There was no specific indication to the extent of details, and they are unable to give us feedback when we start submitting. I would suggest adding anything you think may be relevant I guess according to the titles they provided.
      I haven't seen yet, but they promised they would add one example so we have some idea. 
      Cheers
      Michal 
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Tim Immaculate Bih
    In my research work, I have discovered that most self help groups in my community  that are really impacting the lives of many women do not have websites. This is really sad because it prevents these groups from having access to information and also networking.
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Same discovery here too,but during the webinar it was adviced that we indicate Not Applicable where they do not have website
    • That is a very common issue in developing countries. I have noticed that trend in Senegal as well. Its very unfortunate. According to my findings most of the rural community groups do not have website because  1) they cannot afford a website, 2) they are not tech savvy.  
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Samba Nixon
    THE POWER OF SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
    Entrepreneurs are innovative, highly-motivated, and critical thinkers. When these attributes are combined with the drive to solve social problems, a Social Entrepreneur is born. A social enterprise as any enterprise that ranks social impact on par with, or above, profit concerns.

    “Social Entrepreneurship” is a fairly new “Concept" Social Entrepreneurship combines the passion of a social mission with business disciplines, innovation and determination and is therefore strategically using Business Model Approaches in responding to Social Problems. The Social Problems largely include HIV/AIDS&TB, Poverty, Unemployment, Under-Employment, Drugs and Substance Abuse, Teenage Pregnancy, Prostitution, Crime, Environmental Degradation etc which have hit hardest on the people at the Base of Pyramid (BOP).

    Social entrepreneurs and social enterprises share a commitment to furthering a social mission and improving society. Though the concept of “social entrepreneurship is gaining popularity, it means different things to different people.The new language helps to broaden the playing field. Social entrepreneurs look for the most effective methods of serving their social missions.

    Social entrepreneurs play the role of change agents in the social sector, by:
    a) Adopting a mission to create and sustain social value (not just private value),
    b) Recognizing and relentlessly pursuing new opportunities to serve that mission,
    c) Engaging in a process of continuous innovation, adaptation, and learning,
    d) Acting boldly without being limited by resources currently in hand, and
    e) Exhibiting heightened accountability to the constituencies served and for the outcomes created
    • Maryann Nwanneka Egwuonwu
      Social Entrepreneurship is very good and the world is gradually embracing it and its mission. I am very passionate about being a social entrepreneur.
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      I am so passionate about social entreprenuership and I strongly believe in its concept .Looking where we are going as the world social entreprenuershipis the answear to most of our issues around. 


      It sounds like a new concept but if we look closely it has been there for sometime,we just need to magnify it since nowadays people are becoming very self centred. 

      A good social entreprise should be able to sustain its self,

      the key Grace Pisirai is planning and understanding the market.Once we identify the need/gap we sure should penetrate the market. In my country there are several funding stream from the government I think what is still lacking here is the willing of people or commitment to their entreprises
    • Grace Pisirai
      Great impact their work can have on society but in my country most of these social entrepreneurs have faced a common challenge, FUNDING, in concept launching and some in sustaining their business models.  

      What challenges have social entrepreneurs in your areas faced and how have they overcome them?
    • Tim Immaculate Bih
      Great! How can women entrepreneurs be more innovative?
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Ugomma Ogu
    Sustainability is a very vital aspect of every community development project,either in small or large scale.Many at times i have seen beautiful projects,great ideas and programs that was instituted and never lasted.Many of them stayed for a short period and died down.This is one thing everyone must be ready and willing to plan on.With all the great ideas and plans we all have,there is need for us to work towards sustaining them  even when we are no longer there.This have become an issue with most developing countries,where programs have been abandoned and fizzled out.

    Many communities have welcomed great projects with the hope that it has come to stay,but contrary to their desire these projects go down within a short period.My question  is this,do we actually plan for a long term? are we ready to carry on for as long as we have identified the passion? Are we working towards building a working team that will take over from us when we are no longer there?
    When a vision goes beyond you and can speak even long after you are gone,then one can be rest assured we are working towards sustainability.

    Remember,what you do is not for your applause,it is a call to service and an invitation to build the soceity you desire to see.
    • Grace Pisirai
      @Ugomma

      Sustainablitiy is indeed a vital aspect and there are a number of reasons to expalin why many good prgrams have failed to fully mature , not necessarily that we do not plan for long term. to answer in part  i would like to share https://www.empowerwomen.org/en/community/stories/2016/11/the-only-way-to-predict-my-future-is-to-create-it which also includes @Michal issues of funding.

    • Michal Strahilevitz Ben Eliezer
      Hi Ugomma, 

      Thank you for sharing these thoughts. I think you are right on. One of the issues I have seen with my work, is that often as an implementing agency (I/NGOs), particularly international organizations, are often driven by the sources of funding they receive. Instead of looking at their communities and what the community specifically needs (short and long term), they would look at what is the next call that is out there and how can we win the bid and get more money for the organization to conitnue operating. 

      Also the way in which funding is now being given, particularly by bi-leteral organizations (governments), it doesnt give an organization much space to develop its local community mobilizers , and all is now run by consultants. As such the ability of an organization to commit for longer term support of a local community has decreased significantly. 

      If an organization wants to commit for longer term support of a community there is a need for sustainability in presence and support while continuely evolving the type of support to the changing needs of the community. 

      Best, 
      Michal 
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Ugomma Ogu
    Globally the world is seriously campigning for gender equality and the awareness is gaining ground.But i have my worries and that is,how do we ensure a balaced soceity while pursuing equality? How do we bring in the men to be fully involved without seeing us as a threat? For example,in my community we have been doing programs for girls and women,but they boys are left out and it worries me.When we finish empowering our women,they will be married to these men who may not understand the value and importance of women.Many of us indirectly have neglected the boys and men thinking that they should understand. Even in our schools and homes,we have sidelined them with the view that we dont need to empower them to see the light of what we want to achieve.Last month i carried out an informal survey and questionnaire to get the views of the men,i was shocked to see how threatened and neglcted they felt in their responses. If i can teach my little boy how to value his sisters,respect and appreciate them without feeling cheated,i think i have done a great deal. For us to achieve a balaced society and still champion our course,i think there is need to involve the men too,educate them and ensure they follow up on all our programs.Remember a scoeity is made up of both men and women. To make our work easier,we ought to bring in the men to fully understand,agree with us and support all our projects.That way we can actually see it as a success. Thanks.
    • Grace Pisirai
      I totally agree @Ugomma @Natty and some foundations have been formed based on that principle #HeForShe 
    • Excellent analysis! i think you brought up a very good point... I am a true believer of gender equality but I also believe that equality between men and women can only be achieved if both genders are represented and responsive in all phases of the policy-making process. Integrating both genders in the process, (also known as gender mainstreaming) makes it much easier to promote gender equality and introduce changes.

    2 of 2 Replies
  • Tinuola Aina
    Hello prospective champions. I am indeed happy to be part of this formidable initiative, championing women issues and brain storming on how to make meaningful impacts in our various communities and countries. The webinar was very insightful and comprehensive. Thank you Meral and team.

    I am an entrepreneur and realtor. Over the years, while working with an NGO, I was engaged in various health related projects in communities spanning across HIV /AIDS management and support for PLWHA, distribution of mosquito nets, healthcare centres to mention but few. Also, I mentor girls in  high school on Sexual and Reproductive Health. 

    I look forward to networking with more prospects on this platform. It's been very educative being updated on various challenges and achievements encountered by women in five continents. 
    • Tinuola Aina
      Hello Adenike and Kabubi. It is great connecting with you both on this platform. I will send you both a DM via twitter and we can continue our conversations. I look forward to partnering with you both.
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Will be delighted to be of service
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Ladies " Adenike and Tinuola " i am in the process of starting an NGO and it has a component of mentoring.

      It will be an honour to connect with you to learn from you.
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Hello Tinuola,i also mentor girls in high school majorly public school,i will like to connect with you since we are both Nigerians.
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Daniel Kerber
    Dear Meral (or team),

     "Deadline for completing this form Thursday, 5 December at midnight EST." - that is what's written on the form, but the 5th of December is a Monday. And does that mean the midnight between Monday (5) and Tuesday (6) or before the 5th?

    Is there a mistake with the date or the day of submission?

    • Tinuola Aina
      I observed the error as well. However, due to the day of submission been mentioned first, I believe the date was meant to be the 8th and not 5th.

      It advisable to submit filled-in-forms latest before 12 midnight EST, Monday ,5th December (time difference is crucial here).
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Grace Pisirai
    As we commemorate the World Aids Day today 1 December, iwould like to share http://www.girlsnotbrides.org/endhiv4her-child-marriage/  and i quote "it is really difficult, if not totally impossible, to tackle HIV unless you tackle child marriage. "
  • IKWO OKA

    Since 1998, I have been involved and further developed skills and provided technical services in health and community system strengthening programmes including: reproductive health, HIV/AIDS management and Non-profit institutional capacity building. My skills cover training/facilitation, RH and HIV/AIDS programme management, RH advocacy, gender programming, monitoring and evaluation, strategic review and process planning. I have in the past managed SRH and HIV/AIDS programmes funded by IPPF, JTF, EU Packard Foundation and The Global Fund; reaching a cumulative 2.1 Million men, women and children.

    My greatest motivation as a development worker has been to gain experience and answers on how to move people out of poverty. Hence every step in my professional development and career has been dedicated towards finding answers to the poor state Africa is in. Despite receiving over 3trillion USD, Sub- Saharan Africa ranks first on the poorest in the world- I thought to myself, it means aid is not the answer to poverty, and the question is what then is?

    Unfulfilled with handling grants and aid funds, in May 2011, I resigned my appointment as the Global Fund Projects Director for the organisation I was serving (without a clue on what i was going to do from there onwards! )Howbeit,  I left with strong skills in proposal writing, community project design, planning and implementation and NGO management. It was during the challenging period of being out of job, that I began volunteering to help different individuals and community-based organisations put together community project  proposals, business proposals/plans. In addition, I also co- founded a Non for profit (Centre for Community Empowerment and Sustainable Development- www.cesdev.org). During this period also i stumbled through personal experiences , secondary research, and inductive reasoning  at some facts behind systems strengthening ; whether it be educational, healthcare, agricultural, economic, or community systems, the answer probably lies in economic empowerment of women.

    Currently, I am involved in enterprise development with specific focus on women entrepreneurship. I manage and run a social enterprise (www.theresourcespace.com), where  we provide business hub/ support services to start-ups, micro, small and medium enterprises. In addition, I mentor over 25 women entrepreneurs and provide business management support to women owned enterprise and individuals. I also serve as an independent development consultant, and recently concluded a project on Strengthening Women Engagement for Community Change and Enterprise Development (SWECED)

    My goal in the next five years (2016-2020) is completing a PhD within this period with a focus on researching and showing a correlation between women economic empowerment and financial independence through entrepreneurship, in strengthening community systems for sustainable development. Results from my research hopefully will bring about an adaptive framework that will enhance women economic empowerment in developing and low income countries.

     Additionally, within same period I hope to successfully set up an indigenous women's investment fund that will provide a platform for raising start-up and growth funds for 3500 rural women to set up micro and small rural cottage industries: towards reducing inequalities, increasing household income and, contributing to the sustainable development goals (SDG 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10 and 12).

    It is with excitement and great joy to be part of this movement and i do hope to draw lots of inspiration from members of this group.

    Thank you so much in anticipation. 

  • Anesu Mhlanga
    Hi All,

    I'm Anesu Mhlanga,  Executive Chairman of Elah Capital a Johannesburg based Private Equity and Advisory firm with an interest in investing in woman owned and woman managed businesses in Sub-Saharan Africa in Agribusiness, FMCGs, Housing and Education.   Elah Capital also acts as Advisor to Governments and Corporates in Africa on Women and Agribusiness.

    The focus of our rhetoric is a move from Agriculture to Agribusiness as a holistic approach to investment in the industry in Africa towards beneficiation.  

    As one of the few private equity firms with a focus on women in Sub-Saharan Africa we have found the landscape challenging.  I recently presented a speech at the UN Commission on the Status of Women in March in New York on "Private Equity and its Link to Women and Sustainable Development" it has been my personal experience that DFIs need to begin to actively show real commitment to supporting woman focused funds, as they take an anchor position I believe there will be significant development in women led private equity firms in Africa, which seek an impact investment tailored mandate for women's economic empowerment and the general sustainable economic development of African countries. 

    Thank you for your consideration. 

    Kind Regards, 

    Anesu Mhlanga 
    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Anesu this sound like a very good innitiative,I would like to know more about it .

      Lastly are you doing any work in Botswana?
    • Anesu Mhlanga
      Hi Tela and Ikwo,

      Thank you for your responses.  I will reply to you both collectively since your comments are similar.

      Agribusiness and financing women continue to be a challenge which governments need to be more proactive about addressing in partnership with the private sector.  Whilst I agree that too much of government regulation in the private sector leads to a command economy which hampers the free flow of markets in Africa governments must partner more with the private sector to facilitate finance for women through "Development Guarantees".  Development Guarantees allow for banks to extend credit to rural women in agribusiness. 

      Tela I'm more than happy to help you after the championship please connect with me on LinkedIn.

      Ikwo each country supports it's women entrepreneurs differently.  Here in South Africa there are several financial instruments tailored for financing women.  It will be important to understand the region of interest and I will be able to provide a more in depth response to assist you. 
    • Tela Jummai Victor
      Anesu this is a very good initiative and I am interested cos that what I am working on.I will need your support and assistance on how I can empower Nigeria women into starting agricbusiness.Thanks.
    • IKWO OKA

      Dear Anesu,

      Your focus is quite interesting especially when one considers the challenge of access to business capital faced by women entrepreneurs. I look forward to learning a lot from you, with regards to how women entrepreneurs can access much needed capital for their business.

      Kind regards,

      Ikwo

    4 of 4 Replies
  • Tendai Chidzero
    Hie, I am a founder for Healhwise trust which is 5 months old in malawi,

    I am humbled to be a part of this rally and i expect to learn and share more on how to empower women.

    Thank you
  • Jessica Muñoz Muro

    During this period I was searching institutions that contribute to empower women in Mexico, I found some that support this objective, but then I was surprised, because I have found many websites that help to prevent violence against women.

    As a result I have concluded that in Mexico we are facing a problem higher than the promotion to support empower women; we are facing a problem of respect and tolerance to all individuals. Is incredible how many man hit her wife just because the think is the best “to control them”.

    For me empower of women is the goal of women in my society, but first we have to go long way to fight against violence against women and with this ideology that man are superior to women (machismo).

    I would like to know what has been done in your countries to try to reduce this phenomenon?

    In advance I want tho thank you for your contributions,

    Jessica Muñoz

    • Gaofenngwe Kabubi
      Hi Jessica I guess we are all facing the same issues when it comes to issues of gender based violence. 


      Here in Botswana we do have several programmes from both the government,cooperate and NGOs. 

      Mostly from thegovernment we have funding,NGOs we have programs like psychological support, male engagement, survivors support.

      Personally i thing it is very imperative to have pepertrators programs which seeks to engage with perpetrators of GBV and we need to effectively deal with both cultural and structural violence in our communities and countries.
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro
      Hi @Ikwo OKA and @Dhara Patel
      Thanks for your comments, it make me feel identified with both of you, it is true that this is a fight that is around the world, and we must try to do something to break this cyrcle.
      It is true that if the mother empower their children, probably in a future this problem could end, we must try to suggest a plan to encourage women to educate in different way their children.
      Also I think it is important what Dhara said about the published article, it is true that if we start to give this types of sign maybe in a future the ideology could change.

      Thanks a lot

      Jessica Muñoz
    • IKWO OKA
      Hi Jessica,

      My thoughts around GBV comes round back to the woman. Women have a lot of role to play in ending GBV- for one within the home they have their male children under them for most of their growing years and I think for those formative years the mothers should promote morals that support the fight against GBV, and inequalities. Inotherwords empower their children as advocates early in life. This I believe will eventually break the cycle of viloence with time.
    • Dhara Patel
      Hi Jessica,

      I guess the situation is the same in almost all the community since ancient time. The main reason behind is customs and tradition.   Within these two months many of our regional media published a article on "gender discrimination" and as per them  UN and other International Organizations are trying to demolish our system. As per them It's duty of women to look after husband's parents and kids and to take care of house hold work and they should do it rather thinking about being financial independence.  

      So you can see that How they feel insecure, even when someone is doing work in the direction of empowerment...!! 
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Sylvana Böhrt
    Hi all,

    I'm part of the Business Development Team and as since the deadline for the form submission is fasta approaching I was having issues getting access to the online for. I have tried to access the Form in the following link

    https://goo.gl/forms/me0LzyA8gHulKJjr2

    and it is not working.
    Can somebody help me out sending me the correct link or the steps to have access to the online form?

    Thanks in advance,
    Sylvana

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Tela Jummai Victor

    Hi, I am Jummai Victor Tela from Nigerian. I am an agro-entrepreneur, am into organic vegetable and livestock farming. I am passionate about empowering youths, women and girls with entrepreneurship and leadership skills. I am glad to be part of the “Empower women” platform. I believe I will be empowered to empower more youths, women and girls in my community.

  • Tela Jummai Victor
    Almost 60%of Nigerian women are in poverty. If poverty must end in Nigeria, women have to  work towards achieving gender equality. Can someone please tell me how poverty can be eradicated in Nigeria through empowering women and girls with leadership and entrepreneurial skills?
  • Tela Jummai Victor

    Entrepreneurship is not only about making money or for men alone, is about knowing what will push you forward to make positive change in your life and community.

  • Tela Jummai Victor

    Is it true that most women start business and don’t give much priority to developing leadership and entrepreneurship skills like men does?

    1 of 1 Replies
  • Tela Jummai Victor

    From my primary school day, I have been having the passion of becoming a business women even when I am being asked what you would like to become. I will say a business women. My reason then was to start a business and make money. I went through primary to tertiary institution without studding anything that has to do with business management and development. Lacked encouragement and support from parents, teachers and guardians. Still the interest on business was still in me.

     My quest for business still continues and started making snacks and local drinks for sales, but due to lack of knowledge on how to manage my business, success was futile. I got trained on making African tie and dye, yoghurt making, bead making, home bread and ice cream. None could I use to venture into business. Based on the above training, I engaged in training youth and women on entrepreneurship empowerment with women groups, youth organizations, etc. yet I could not continue. 

    Before I got married, I met my husband and I told him all the challenges I have been facing concerning becoming a successful entrepreneur. And I will never forget he said to me “Because you are connected to me you will become what you want to become by God’s grace”, since then he has been assisting me with all that I need to become successful in business. The passion for farming started when I got married. Behind my house I raised a garden and started organic livestock and vegetable farming for the family consumption and for sales till date.

    Now I have stopped being anxious about starting a business for the sake of making money, rather I took my time to learn more about business development and good management. I got trained on courses on Business Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning, Branding Building, Marketing and Business Plan Strategies. I have gone on research about organic farming. The concept I now have on business is different from when I started business, I have business name registered, my business plan ready that will make social impact in helping women and girls with entrepreneurship and leadership training to become successful entrepreneurs and leaders of their own lives. I know I not where I want  to be, but I have left where I used to be, there is a change within me that already exploring and ready to make lasting impact to mu life, family, community and my nation. In this women of change that am in, I know I will get connected to the right people who are passionate about seeing people maximizing their potentials and the UN Empow

    • aderemi bamgboye
      Your story is an interesting and motivating one. There are loads of women that do not get support because of their gender , most believe she should go get married and become a mother and a wife. Your story is an encouragement to me and im sure others. Keep up the good work and all the best in what you do.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • claudia rivas
    I'm trying to research for quality non-profit and profit organizations. But i guess the time is very short (1 week), i'm asking people but they tend to take some days to answer and well here in Peru many small non profit doesn't even have a webpage, it is a hard task and i'm trying to look for the best information i can.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Juracy Johnson

    This is a big challenge, as Mexico does not, in general, have Institutions that consider men and women as equal. We've got a long way to go.  But we do have to start! and I am so willing to do this.
    • Juracy Johnson
      Hi Jessica! This is hard for us, but I hope the Empowering Women team sees that there are really no organizations that prefer to hire women most than men and/or that consider men and women equal. And you are so right! It is very hard and each time gets harder because people don't want to make the effort, they go the easy way. How women are chosen by their "other" qualities (I have a survey proving this) is so sad! Guedany I am from Mexico. My fahter is Brazilian. My name before marriage is Juracy Soares. I was born in Ensenada and live in Ensenada. My mom is Mexican, my husband is from Tampico, Tamaulipas but his grandfather was Scottish, that is why the Johnson.
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro

      Hello Juracy!

      When I read your post I feel completely identified with this issue, it is true that in Mexico is hard to find an institution that consider men and women as equal, but then I felt worried about Mexico's situation, the reality that we are facing is so hard and we have a lot to do in order to create more opportunities for women.

      Sometime I feel that our culture and our customs are the cause of which we do not advanced in the support and respect to the woman.

      Best,

      Jessica

    • Guedany Figueiras Ayala
      Hi, are you from mexico or working o mexico?
    • Tela Jummai Victor
      I realized that information is one the best tool in bridging every gap in life. If Mexican women will be empowered with information on thier right of honour from thier creator as women and stand up to the challange of leadership position, I believe there will be a big relief for the women in Mexico.
       
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Daniel Kerber
    Sorry if I sound repetitive; but can anyone help answer a few questions for me?

    1) Do the institutions have to be based in or founded in the country of research? 
    2) If we want to contact institutes or organisations or companies to ask for details, do we have approval to mention that we are participating in this rally and we have to complete this research-based task?
    3) When will the recorded version be put up so we could listen to the details of categorizing again? WILL it be put up in the first place? 

    Thank you in advance.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Daniel Kerber
    I read this recently and I personally like it- it's good for men to also understand that empowering women has a lot of "collateral benefit" on all members of society. It's also a good answer to the awful hype of "meninism".
    Any opinions on this article: http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/male-suicide-masculinity-crisis-feminism-only-solution-a7442276.html
  • Dita Dobranja
    I am from Kosovo, and am currently working in a project that aims at women's economic empowerment.

    However, for a country like Kosovo, where data is not easily accessible or readily available, especially disaggregated by gender, working in women's economic empowerment requires a lot of work in research, to be able to pinpoint issues that need to be addressed. This is a big challenge, since there is no data, and we need to work on primary research to get at least usable data.

    One other issue that I work on and want to raise awareness toward is the importance of the double shift. In Kosovo, the perception is overwhelming that women, even when they work in the market, are responsible for all the household and care work that is carried out. Moreover, this work is also not considered as as contribution to the household, when women are not employed. The contributions are only considered material.

    So currently, these are two major issues I wanted to mention, if anyone has experience on how to deal with lack of gendered data, as well as in how to deal with lack of valuation of care work, I would love to know some of your experiences and how you dealt with them.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      For me because i concerntrated on a local community,i had to access a near comprehensive data from the local governemnt office,went to religous places and market assocaition.This gave me a rough information of the data  had to work with.Sincerely it was a very tough venture,so much unwillingness to cooperate ad help on the part of all those i met,but eventually i got what i want.Secondly i carried out a survey which took some time too.The fact is in some countries data bank is a difficult thing and many of them dont have it.So we struggle to get it ourselves.

      Lack of value for care work most times comes as a result of cutural or traditional practice,where the woman is assumed to to all these things as her rightful duties without expecting any appreciation of assistance.That is the more reason you are doing what you into now,when people like you have identified these problems and are on a course to find a solution i feel things will take shape.What i did during a village project i embarked on is this,i did a community outreach for the people to explain to them the importance of helping the women.I told them that when a woman is overworked,she can break down and not take care of her home.I also told the men their role in family is central and they must support their women.Though due to deep cultural practices it was hard for them to accept  and swallow all i said,what i did was to create a periodic talkshows which helped butress our vision.Over time things started changing.
      One lesson i got is this,in anything you are doing for your people,dont expect the results to be spontenoues,give it some time and ensure a sustainable plan to keep it going.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Shweta Bhatia
    I had mentioned this elsewhere on this site, but it's a concept that I think is an important way to support and build up a woman who is trying to make a name for herself or is facing discrimination in the workplace because of her gender. One of the most important assets to a woman trying to build herself up, or even one who is established in her profession, is her allies. Making or having allies is a more immediate way of supporting women in the work sector than trying to change the mindsets and teach the future generation about gender equality. And I'm not saying those last two solutions are not important - they are extremely important and major ways in which we can create a more equal world, but they take time. Maybe the allies available are small in number, especially in different parts of the world, but that means it's even more important for us to be open and advertise ourselves as allies to all who need it. And to also talk to people we know who would be willing to be allies and connections to women, who also may have other connections and so on. It's about making a web of connections that will help women in the face of inequality and unfairness and discrimination - to support them and help them go about any obstacles that may come up in their lives.
    • Tela Jummai Victor
      Honestly in most parts of the world women are treated as second class citizens with low voice in decision making even in close family relations. What I believe will be a solution to this is empowering women with leadership and entrepreneurial skills, simply self-reliance even under the roof of a man. women have a place in this world which cannot be occupied by any man.
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Dhara Patel
    It's very good task and I am more interested as I have faced "harassment" recently at one of the Government Organization. I have to go long to raise my voice. I have been threatened , I have been fired for raising voice (creating atmosohere where I am unable to work). And It's also not enough. To teach me a lesson , My identity has been disclosed (It's Law that No one can disclose the identity of complainant to public) and It's become challange for me to get a job in my Field.  I never lose my heart and they got tough competition but I really want to make sure that No one else sould have face this and They can have knowledge to raise voice against sexual harassment rather just leaving the job.

    well, my point is that We can't reach to the any conclusion by getting idea of How many women employee are there and Is there any specific gender program or not..!!  (I am extremely sorry for sentence I have written , My english is not so good. i urge you to please understand the thing I want to convey).  If I talk about my city, It's tough task to find out the organization which has specific gender program and If they claim , Its more sensitive case to find out their policy or how they conduct..!!


    I will try to put my best effort through this research form.


    Thanks



    • Juracy Johnson
      I understand perfectly! I've also been harassed. I did raise my voice, but in Mexico, women hardly ever win. We must change that with education, participation and support.
    • Oriana Mansur
      You're an inspiration Dhara and we admire your bravery! There's a whole world of people who support you - I support you and everybody on this platform does. Let's all continue advocating and ending what has happened to you and what happens to countless other women on a daily basis. 
    • Erastus Cheruiyot
      And despite how sad it has been, yours is an inspiring ambition. Thanks for taking the lead. All of us are here to join hands with brave trailblazers like you. Let's be thinking of innovating platforms, methods & avenues where voices cannot be surpressed.
    3 of 3 Replies
  • Eri I
    Does the  "Word of Mouth" , is an effective opportunity ,to have a great impact on promoting women and their developments and Why ?
    • Erastus Cheruiyot
      Word of mouth is indeed among the most effective forms of promotion, especially when it comes from a trusted/credible source. As with all marketing and promotion efforts, its effictiveness has a strong social and psychological basis. Human beings are characteristically influenced by suggestions that come from the people we love/trust/look up to. That may be one of the top reasons why some organizations partner with celebrities/influential public figures as their ambassadors - They have a wider circle of influence, their word is taken more seriously and is more likely to be acted upon.
    • Nina Corder
      I beleive word of mouth is more effective than media advertising. Work of mouth also known as networking in my field. Hence, you are working on referral based method at promoting your campaign, business or program. Referral based often time more effective because it is based on trust, trust from people who refer or conducting the 'word of mouth' referral. Often time you will be more successfull for 'call for action' or close business when it come to work of mouth.
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Nwanneka Okolo
     
    I worked with one of the premier banks in Nigeria for quite sometime and discrimination against women was rife. During my time in senior management positions though, I did my best to correct, to a large extent, the anomalies created by my predecessors over the years where they consistently and intentionally passed over qualified and capable women for male mediocres. I come from a country where women are still so brazenly marginalized, discriminated against and paid less than their male counterpart even though they do most of the work. 
     
    When I left paid employment I establish a non profit organisation (Lift Saxum Ltd/Gte) that supports women and youth to start and grow their businesses. From experience, once a woman has economic power, she suddenly gets heard, albeit reluctantly or condescendingly. But to my mind, that is a good start. 

    It gives me so much joy to help in developing the young ones (males inclusive) but with emphasis on the girl child. I teach moral instruction and leadership skills in two secondary schools -one Co-Ed and one Girls' School- on voluntary basis. I also represent my organisation in the Technical Working Group established by the British Council and Girl Effect Nigeria on drafting of a national curriculum for Safe Spaces for girls in Nigeria. The girl child of today is the woman of tomorrow so we must start from them. 
    In my space the work is huge. There is so much to be done given the population we have to grapple with. 
    I am  happy to meet you all and hope to learn from you.
    Working with Empower Women will open new vistas for me!
     
     
    Nwanneka Okolo 
    Enugu, South East Nigeria
    • Tela Jummai Victor
      I am happy to meet someone like you on empower women. I was actually a victim of no support and consideration while pursuing my dreams of being an entrepreneur. I was always looked upon as a failure, that led me to start empowering women and girls with leadership and entrepreneur skills at my little capacity. You ideas and porgramms are great one, love to learn and have more ideas from you and your experinces.
    • Nina Corder
      Love your story and GOOD LUCK at continue your passion and mission for your organiztaion!
    2 of 2 Replies
  • Nwanneka Okolo
    Hi Maryann, I do agree with Oriana Mansur on her suggestions in respect of training. It is interesting what the person who is barely literate will learn under adult education programme. A well crafted curriculum will help in no small way to bring them up to speed. 
  • Nwanneka Okolo
    Hi Clara,
    i sure would like to connect with you as this sustainable mode of preservation of perishables will be of great use to the rural women that my organisation train in diverse fields. The link you posted is not going but I logged onto your page with www.claphijoe


  • Nwanneka Okolo
    Hi Maryann, the organisations we are to research under the Business Development Group need not be registered on the Empower Women platform. 

    Inwould like to connect with you. I am based in Enugu, Nigeria.
  • Florence Wambui
    Great discussion where one gets  diversity of ideas of what constitutes social enterprises and how they can be tailor-made to become a success especially in the developing world.
  • Florence Wambui
    Thanks for the Webinar this is the perfect opportunity to sharpen our skills on various challenges facing the social enterprises.I have also learned the diversity of working with social entrerises and opportunities there in both in the developed and developing the world.
  • Bahar Aldanmaz
    Hi everyone,

    I feel the enthusiasm we all share and wanted to remind all of us the importance of self-care! I know we all want the ultimate change but remember it takes time and we need to take care ourselves! I found this article very helpful which basically claims some people do not burn out by using their emotional intelligence. I just wanted share it with you.

    https://hbr.org/2016/11/why-some-people-get-burned-out-and-others-dont


    Best,

    Bahar 
    • Erastus Cheruiyot
      Thanks for caring & sharing. We are stepping into an age where emotional intelligence (EI) is gaining more and more significance over IQ. This special fuculty is essential for sustained performance & development. It's becoming clear that EI needs to nurtured from a very early age.
    • Jessica Muñoz Muro
      Hello Bahar,
      Thanks for share this article, it is very interesting!
      And it is right, we have to learn how to control aour emotional intelligence.

      Best,
      Jessica Muñoz
    • ADENIKE ADEDEJI
      Thank you Bahar,checking it out right away
    • Guedany Figueiras Ayala
      thanks that so great!!! :)
    4 of 4 Replies
  • Manisha Kad
    Hello Marel,

    Thank you for webinar. We are now clear with your views about business development group.
    As a social entrpreneur, is it possibe to explore some business opportunies where I can use my technology knowledge?
    I can see there are many business owners and entrepreneurs on this platform.
    • Ugomma Ogu
      Hi, i think you tech knowledge can come in handy when you identify a need and create a solution for it.Technology is very vast and am sure you have your key competence which i suggest you look around and see where and how you can fit into the  world.I am always happy to see women who are experienced in technology.
      keep it up and strive to reach the peak of your career.Thanks
    1 of 1 Replies
  • Brotati Das
    Hello Prospective Champions.....Its was a great discussion and perfect platform for women who are passionate about WEE issues. My question is are we just considering  Developing countries ? I come from a Developing couuntry ( India ) where i have worked on developmental issues and now I am living in New York and I can see that even women is NYC are facing discrimination on gender issues. For this project can I focus on NYC and the organisations working on WEE. thanks