Empowering Women Vs Men

Often times men have viewed Women economic empowerment as a "threat to them." The threats they look at include; disrespect, control & ownership in terms of resources, property, decision making at home and place of work, marriage breakups,among others. Could this be a result of misunderstanding the concept of Women Economic Empowerment? If yes, what are some of the best strategies of getting men on board and letting them understand the concept of women economic empowerment is not a threat to them but rather a blessing and advantageous to them.
  • Courtney Mone't Randolph
    Peace Mr. Okello, I believe the first strategy in getting men onboard and getting them to understand the benefits of women's economic empowerment is to start a campaign that urges men to support women and most importantly build a class/seminar/or conference for men lead by men teaching about the many ways that women's economic empowerment benefits the whole world. They would learn how it benefits families and society as a whole. I believe if we start with a campaign that shows the support from men raising awareness about women's economic empowerment and using that campaign to develope a conference supported by women leaders in the subject but led by men for men. This could be a great start to get men's ears and heart to open.
  • Sowemimo Omobolajoko
    I agree with you Tonny, the concept of Women economic empowerment is seen as a treat to men, one of the few things i have come to understand about African culture, man is head of the family, society etc, any belief that says otherwise is a not accepted and it becomes a treat. Over the years these beliefs are changing because the world at large is changing, one of the strategies we can adopt is inclusion of men. if you ask me, there can't be Women economic empowerment without involving men at whatever stage needed. Also we can look for a respected-able and accepted man within the community, that believes and allows Women economic empowerment within his own family, such a man can champion the Women economic empowerment concept. Overall, i personally believe Women economic empowerment has come to stay and we should allow it time to find it footing. Just my thoughts!!!!!
  • Tonny Okello
    Thanks members for the comments so much useful information..
  • Liz Guantai
    The approach to women economic empowerment should involve inclusive dialogues that bring men on board. Men should also be empowered on the importance of achieving SDG5. To end the misconception that WEE is meant to make women take up the traditional role of men, but rather to improve the welfare of women and the entire society, men must as well be involved in the empowerment process.
    • Tonny Okello
      Thanks Liz, the challenge is, what is the best approach in achieving this, am facing a very big challenge of men who have determined minds and changing the set of these men is the most important thing..However, how best can one change this? I will be grateful if i got a few suggestions..
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  • Stella Bakibinga
    Yes Tonny, most men misconstrue the concept of WEE. Some men Think that by women being empowered, they will be harder to manipulate. I guess we need to repackage the messages to help men embrace WEE with no resistance.
    • Tonny Okello
      Yes Stella, I completely agree with you on this. However, I happened to chat with a few men using a different approach using the importance of sending girls to school and how they can change society. They challenged with today's marriages and saying most of the marriages fail because when when get educated ad empowered economically they tend to forget their core roles in the marriage and become disrespectiveful to the husband. How best then can we repackage such massages regarding WEE that will clearly and comprehensively change such mentalities of men so that they become part of the struggle?
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  • Evelyn Bisona Fonkem
    Quality fear no equality.when women are economically empowered,resilient communities are build.
    • Tonny Okello
      Thanks Evelyn & Stella. I completely in support of this. However, how do we achieve the quality when we need to deal with fears of those who would otherwise help us achieve the equality? Stella, just like i replied to your previous comment; The fear is the biggest challenge these men have and i think in the struggle for WEE we don't need to ignore the fear these men have so that they become party to the struggle.
    • Stella Bakibinga
      Right! Real men embrace equality with no fear.
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  • Men need to be sensitized about women economic empowerment by governments and other international community entities. It is a false myth in many societies that empowered women are hard to control. It is not true and that perception need to change and start seeing women as equal partners in a family set up.
    • Tonny Okello
      Thanks Robert, governments have a big role to play both socially and legally, but let's look at were the problem originates, we have cultures and traditions especially in Africa were boys/men are brought up with a mentality that they are the heads of families, decision makers, owners of resources, etc and the girls/ladies are there to serve them, with such a setting in the family these boys grow into men and carry the same mentality into their own marriages and families and thus the mentality is transferred downwards, family plays a very big and important role here as well.
    • Stella Bakibinga
      Yes, Robert. The biggest obstacle is men thinking that their masculinity is threatened by WEE. There is need to raise awareness right from when boys are still so Young so that they from that early age accept it as a good cause.
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  • Joy Eze
    Awareness and education is the key we need to start using whatever resources and channels we have to convince men that, women economic empowerment is not a threat to them but a development they all need to embrace for the development of our nation.
    • Tonny Okello
      Thanks Joy, i completely agree. If you mention education and awareness, how best then do we package this awareness and education that we need to help these men change their mind set, and how best do we approach these men?
    • Stella Bakibinga
      Well said Joy!
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